2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165915
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Risk Behaviors Of Rural Sixth Graders
Author(s):
Felton, Gwen
Author Details:
Gwen Felton, PhD, Associate Professor, University of South Carolina Department of Family and Community Health Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: gwen.felton@sc.edu
Abstract:
We sought to analyze the frequency and risks factors (correlates) of single and concurrent health risk behaviors (HRBs) including obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, and alcohol use in a sample of 352 rural, predominately African-American 6th graders. Data were collected using physical measures and a self-report questionnaire. Of the sample, 32% had no HRB, 44% had 1 HRB and 24% had 2 or more HRBs. Forty-three percent of girls were obese and physically inactive and 57% of boys were obese and 21 % were inactive. Cigarette smoking and alcohol use were more prevalent in boys (9%, 15%) than girls (4%, 2%). Polychotomous logistic regression analyses revealed social risk factors, such as tv watching and time spent talking on the phone, to be strongly associated with both 1 HRB and 2 HRBs among the girls. For boys, race was the only correlate of 1 H RB and behavioral modeling factors such as best friend physically inactive and best friend drinks were the most salient risk factors for 2 HRBs. Obesity and inactivity were more prevalent in this sample than in the general population. Gender differences in the risk factors were evident. Our findings indicate that gender-specific interventions that recognize the social needs of girls and the influence of behavioral modeling on the health risk behaviors of boys are most likely to succeed in reducing single and concurrent health risk behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Risk Behaviors Of Rural Sixth Gradersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFelton, Gwenen_US
dc.author.detailsGwen Felton, PhD, Associate Professor, University of South Carolina Department of Family and Community Health Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: gwen.felton@sc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165915-
dc.description.abstractWe sought to analyze the frequency and risks factors (correlates) of single and concurrent health risk behaviors (HRBs) including obesity, physical inactivity, smoking, and alcohol use in a sample of 352 rural, predominately African-American 6th graders. Data were collected using physical measures and a self-report questionnaire. Of the sample, 32% had no HRB, 44% had 1 HRB and 24% had 2 or more HRBs. Forty-three percent of girls were obese and physically inactive and 57% of boys were obese and 21 % were inactive. Cigarette smoking and alcohol use were more prevalent in boys (9%, 15%) than girls (4%, 2%). Polychotomous logistic regression analyses revealed social risk factors, such as tv watching and time spent talking on the phone, to be strongly associated with both 1 HRB and 2 HRBs among the girls. For boys, race was the only correlate of 1 H RB and behavioral modeling factors such as best friend physically inactive and best friend drinks were the most salient risk factors for 2 HRBs. Obesity and inactivity were more prevalent in this sample than in the general population. Gender differences in the risk factors were evident. Our findings indicate that gender-specific interventions that recognize the social needs of girls and the influence of behavioral modeling on the health risk behaviors of boys are most likely to succeed in reducing single and concurrent health risk behaviors.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:24Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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