2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165916
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Risk Behaviors And Coping Strategies Of African American Sixth Graders
Author(s):
Ark, Pamela
Author Details:
Pamela Ark, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, University of Tennessee, Tennessee, USA, (updated February 2015) email: park@tnstate.edu
Abstract:
Children, eleven to fourteen years of age, experience a time of lifestyle change. The child has the potential to develop health behaviors that could result in illness and premature death, or health and a long life. The Healthy People 2000 (U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, 1990) report recommended education of children regarding injury prevention and control, light to moderate physical activity, and healthy nutritional choices. According to the Children's Defense Fund (1991), 45.8 percent of African American children are poor, thereby considered as an at-risk population. Ryan-Wenger (1990) has conducted nursing research to identify the coping strategies of children in relationship to health promotion. The purposes of this research study were to examine height, weight, and blood pressure measurements; to investigate youth health risk behaviors and coping strategies; and to determine relationships among physiological variables, health risk behaviors, and coping strategies of African American sixth graders. Health risk behaviors were measured with a modified version of the 1995 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), a 70 item survey on unintentional injuries; tobacco, alcohol, and drug use; dietary behavior; and physical activity. Coping strategies were measured with Ryan-Wenger's School-agers Coping Strategies Inventory (SCSI), a 26 item survey on frequency and effectiveness of coping strategies. The conceptual framework guiding the study was Neuman's Systems Model (1995). The sample was 173 African American sixth graders, ages 11 to 14, females (n=98) and males (n=75), from five inner city schools. Study findings included: females were taller and weighed more than males, but there were no statistically significant differences in body mass index. Statistically significant differences were found by gender with more males than females reporting physical fighting. Older male sixth graders, ages 12 and 13, than females of the same age reported tobacco and marijuana use. There was zero self-report use of cocaine. There were no statistically significant differences on alcohol use, dietary behaviors, or physical activity. Coping strategies (sample mean was 19.4) used more often were prayer (75 percent) and watch television or listen to music (65 percent). Multiple regression showed significant interaction effects of unintentional injuries with age, gender, and SCSI effectiveness scale. Conclusions included that there were few statistically significant differences in means between female and male sixth graders, age 11, suggesting that changes in risk behavior and coping strategies occur during this time. There were statistically significant differences in means between females and males, ages 12 and 13, suggesting the need for further investigation of coping strategies. Implications for nursing practice and research using Neuman's Systems Model include coordination among school health nurses, health education faculty, and dietary staff regarding youth health risk behaviors. Further investigation of coping strategies of the sixth graders and their family in relationship to the environment would be useful to determine effective coping strategies for the family unit.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Risk Behaviors And Coping Strategies Of African American Sixth Gradersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArk, Pamelaen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Ark, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, University of Tennessee, Tennessee, USA, (updated February 2015) email: park@tnstate.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165916-
dc.description.abstractChildren, eleven to fourteen years of age, experience a time of lifestyle change. The child has the potential to develop health behaviors that could result in illness and premature death, or health and a long life. The Healthy People 2000 (U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, 1990) report recommended education of children regarding injury prevention and control, light to moderate physical activity, and healthy nutritional choices. According to the Children's Defense Fund (1991), 45.8 percent of African American children are poor, thereby considered as an at-risk population. Ryan-Wenger (1990) has conducted nursing research to identify the coping strategies of children in relationship to health promotion. The purposes of this research study were to examine height, weight, and blood pressure measurements; to investigate youth health risk behaviors and coping strategies; and to determine relationships among physiological variables, health risk behaviors, and coping strategies of African American sixth graders. Health risk behaviors were measured with a modified version of the 1995 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), a 70 item survey on unintentional injuries; tobacco, alcohol, and drug use; dietary behavior; and physical activity. Coping strategies were measured with Ryan-Wenger's School-agers Coping Strategies Inventory (SCSI), a 26 item survey on frequency and effectiveness of coping strategies. The conceptual framework guiding the study was Neuman's Systems Model (1995). The sample was 173 African American sixth graders, ages 11 to 14, females (n=98) and males (n=75), from five inner city schools. Study findings included: females were taller and weighed more than males, but there were no statistically significant differences in body mass index. Statistically significant differences were found by gender with more males than females reporting physical fighting. Older male sixth graders, ages 12 and 13, than females of the same age reported tobacco and marijuana use. There was zero self-report use of cocaine. There were no statistically significant differences on alcohol use, dietary behaviors, or physical activity. Coping strategies (sample mean was 19.4) used more often were prayer (75 percent) and watch television or listen to music (65 percent). Multiple regression showed significant interaction effects of unintentional injuries with age, gender, and SCSI effectiveness scale. Conclusions included that there were few statistically significant differences in means between female and male sixth graders, age 11, suggesting that changes in risk behavior and coping strategies occur during this time. There were statistically significant differences in means between females and males, ages 12 and 13, suggesting the need for further investigation of coping strategies. Implications for nursing practice and research using Neuman's Systems Model include coordination among school health nurses, health education faculty, and dietary staff regarding youth health risk behaviors. Further investigation of coping strategies of the sixth graders and their family in relationship to the environment would be useful to determine effective coping strategies for the family unit.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:25Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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