2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165917
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Experience Of Mexican American Women With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Author(s):
Alcozer, Francesca
Author Details:
Francesca Alcozer, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: falcozer@pobox.upenn.edu
Abstract:
Nursing awareness of the nature and experience of type 2 diabetes mellitus for women is scant. Little is known about the constellation of meanings associated with living with diabetes and the relationship of meanings to social and cultural contexts. As a whole, the nature and experience of diabetes itself, the effect of gender, the individual and family food habits, the individual and family's physical activity patterns and cultural beliefs and values have not been extensively addressed in diabetes research. The purpose of this naturalistic research study was to explore the lived experiences of Mexican American women with type 2 diabetes mellitus within the context of the family, the meanings attached to their experience and what factors they identify that facilitate and/or hinder their living with diabetes. Understanding the Mexican American's emic perspective of diabetes is essential for the practice of holistic nursing care. The specific research questions addressed were: 1) How do Mexican American women with type 2 diabetes mellitus experience living with diabetes? 2) How do Mexican American women with diabetes experience diabetes within the context of their family? 3) What is the Mexican American woman's explanatory model of type 2 diabetes mellitus? 4) What factors do Mexican American women with diabetes identify that facilitate or inhibit their living with diabetes? The study sample consisted of 20 Mexican American women age between 27 and 45 living in the greater Austin, TX area. The mean age of the sample was 33. The study sample had an average length of time since diagnosis of 8 years with a range from 1 year to twenty-six years. All the women were partnered with children at home, employed, Catholic, high school graduates, and US born. Data collection consisted of anthroprometric measurements, acculturation scale, in-depth open-ended interviews, participant observation of attendance at outpatient visits, attendance at diabetes support groups, and in-home meal preparation. The stories of the twenty women consistently expressed their experiences in the context in which they lived and their experiences with diabetes. Preliminary findings indicate the most frequently expressed experience of living with diabetes is - a death sentence. Role responsibilities and health provider attitudes are factors that hinder living with diabetes. Explanatory models of diabetes were inconsistent with the biomedical model of diabetes. These preliminary findings suggest that the psychological impact of diabetes as a life threatening illness may be a significant factor in Mexican American women living with diabetes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Experience Of Mexican American Women With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitusen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlcozer, Francescaen_US
dc.author.detailsFrancesca Alcozer, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: falcozer@pobox.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165917-
dc.description.abstractNursing awareness of the nature and experience of type 2 diabetes mellitus for women is scant. Little is known about the constellation of meanings associated with living with diabetes and the relationship of meanings to social and cultural contexts. As a whole, the nature and experience of diabetes itself, the effect of gender, the individual and family food habits, the individual and family's physical activity patterns and cultural beliefs and values have not been extensively addressed in diabetes research. The purpose of this naturalistic research study was to explore the lived experiences of Mexican American women with type 2 diabetes mellitus within the context of the family, the meanings attached to their experience and what factors they identify that facilitate and/or hinder their living with diabetes. Understanding the Mexican American's emic perspective of diabetes is essential for the practice of holistic nursing care. The specific research questions addressed were: 1) How do Mexican American women with type 2 diabetes mellitus experience living with diabetes? 2) How do Mexican American women with diabetes experience diabetes within the context of their family? 3) What is the Mexican American woman's explanatory model of type 2 diabetes mellitus? 4) What factors do Mexican American women with diabetes identify that facilitate or inhibit their living with diabetes? The study sample consisted of 20 Mexican American women age between 27 and 45 living in the greater Austin, TX area. The mean age of the sample was 33. The study sample had an average length of time since diagnosis of 8 years with a range from 1 year to twenty-six years. All the women were partnered with children at home, employed, Catholic, high school graduates, and US born. Data collection consisted of anthroprometric measurements, acculturation scale, in-depth open-ended interviews, participant observation of attendance at outpatient visits, attendance at diabetes support groups, and in-home meal preparation. The stories of the twenty women consistently expressed their experiences in the context in which they lived and their experiences with diabetes. Preliminary findings indicate the most frequently expressed experience of living with diabetes is - a death sentence. Role responsibilities and health provider attitudes are factors that hinder living with diabetes. Explanatory models of diabetes were inconsistent with the biomedical model of diabetes. These preliminary findings suggest that the psychological impact of diabetes as a life threatening illness may be a significant factor in Mexican American women living with diabetes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:26Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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