Decision Making And Its Relation To Outcome Measures Of Psychological Adjustment In Adolescents With Epilepsy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165918
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Decision Making And Its Relation To Outcome Measures Of Psychological Adjustment In Adolescents With Epilepsy
Author(s):
Allen, Bernice
Author Details:
Bernice Allen, MS/MSc, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: ballen@vcu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose:The purpose of this study was to explore patterns of decision making in adolescents with epilepsy and the relation of these patterns to psychosocial adjustment. Methods:The study used a convenience sample of 30 adolescents, 12 to 19 years old, functioning at grade level in school. Sixty percent were female. There were two decision making instruments and two outcome measures. Interviews were conducted in the patients' homes using the Adolescent Decision Making Inventory (ADI). Subjects also completed The Adolescent Psychosocial Functional Assessment Tool (APFAT), Harter's Global Self-Worth Subscale of the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents, and the Adolescent Psychosocial Seizure Inventory (APSI). Results:These adolescents reported an average of 3 seizures in the past year and fairly good perceived seizure control. They had moderately positive perceptions of self-worth and scored low for psychosocial adjustment problems. Numerical scores on the ADI categorized subjects as immature, transitional, or mature decision makers. On average, the sample scored in the transitional category and reported moderate participation in the decisions affecting their daily activities. Decision making patterns as measured by the ADI and the APFAT Decision Making scale had no correlation with selfworth. The APFAT Decision Making scale did correlate with 2 of the 9 APSI subscales while the ADI correlated with the same two subscales as well as three others. It was noteworthy that the ADI was moderately correlated with the entire APSI scale and had a significant correlation to the Adjustment to Seizures subscale of the APSI. Therefore, decision making patterns in adolescents with epilepsy were related to the degree of psychosocial adjustment problems in this sample, with more mature decision makers demonstrating better psychosocial adjustment. Conclusions:These results suggest that assessing maturity of decision making and the degree of participation in decision making in adolescents with epilepsy might identify those at risk to psychosocial adjustment problems. This also indicates a need for fostering mature decision making in adolescents with epilepsy, and possibly those with other chronic illnesses, as a strategy for preventing such adjustment problems. Research in this area on a larger and more diverse sample is needed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDecision Making And Its Relation To Outcome Measures Of Psychological Adjustment In Adolescents With Epilepsyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Berniceen_US
dc.author.detailsBernice Allen, MS/MSc, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: ballen@vcu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165918-
dc.description.abstractPurpose:The purpose of this study was to explore patterns of decision making in adolescents with epilepsy and the relation of these patterns to psychosocial adjustment. Methods:The study used a convenience sample of 30 adolescents, 12 to 19 years old, functioning at grade level in school. Sixty percent were female. There were two decision making instruments and two outcome measures. Interviews were conducted in the patients' homes using the Adolescent Decision Making Inventory (ADI). Subjects also completed The Adolescent Psychosocial Functional Assessment Tool (APFAT), Harter's Global Self-Worth Subscale of the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents, and the Adolescent Psychosocial Seizure Inventory (APSI). Results:These adolescents reported an average of 3 seizures in the past year and fairly good perceived seizure control. They had moderately positive perceptions of self-worth and scored low for psychosocial adjustment problems. Numerical scores on the ADI categorized subjects as immature, transitional, or mature decision makers. On average, the sample scored in the transitional category and reported moderate participation in the decisions affecting their daily activities. Decision making patterns as measured by the ADI and the APFAT Decision Making scale had no correlation with selfworth. The APFAT Decision Making scale did correlate with 2 of the 9 APSI subscales while the ADI correlated with the same two subscales as well as three others. It was noteworthy that the ADI was moderately correlated with the entire APSI scale and had a significant correlation to the Adjustment to Seizures subscale of the APSI. Therefore, decision making patterns in adolescents with epilepsy were related to the degree of psychosocial adjustment problems in this sample, with more mature decision makers demonstrating better psychosocial adjustment. Conclusions:These results suggest that assessing maturity of decision making and the degree of participation in decision making in adolescents with epilepsy might identify those at risk to psychosocial adjustment problems. This also indicates a need for fostering mature decision making in adolescents with epilepsy, and possibly those with other chronic illnesses, as a strategy for preventing such adjustment problems. Research in this area on a larger and more diverse sample is needed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:27Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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