2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165922
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Living With Coronary Heart Disease (CHD): Women's Psychosocial Issues
Author(s):
Amer, Kim
Author Details:
Kim Amer, PhD, Assistant Professor, DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: kamer@wppost.depaul.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this ongoing qualitative study is to identify, describe and provide a theoretical analysis of the psychologic and social processes which contribute to women's recovery in coronary heart disease; specifically, those women who do not participate in outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Ultimately, the qualitative research process will provide a theoretical basis for the development, initiation, and evaluation of gender specific interventions designed to enhance recovery and rehabilitation in women. Background: Historically, rehabilitative issues related to coronary heart disease have typically focused on issues pertaining to men, with little attention given to the unique experiences of women recovering from cardiac illness or surgery. More women than men are dying of CHD; more than 500,000 women die from CHD each year, making the disease a major cause of morbidity and disability in women over age 50. A variety of psychosocial factors have been cited as risk factors for the development of heart disease, yet few studies have explored the nature of the stressors that occur following the onset of heart disease in women. As a result, there is no consensus on the defining characteristics of psychosocial rehabilitation or recovery following. Cardiac rehabilitation offers a comprehensive approach to managing manifestations of cardiovascular disease which impedes the progression of pathophysiological processes as well as enhance psychosocial well-being. However, only 11% to 15% of cardiac patients who are eligible participate in a cardiac rehabilitation program. Furthermore, the small percentage of women who participate in such programs have higher drop out rates than their male counterparts. The low participation and the high drop out rates of women may be secondary to the current rehabilitative guidelines which have been derived from studies of men. Sample: The sample will consist of approximately 20 English speaking female informants who have experienced a cardiac event. The target population for the research are women who are hospitalized with cardiac illness at a large teaching hospital and who are not planning to attend outpatient cardiac rehabilitation for reasons such as lack of insurance, lack of physician referral, or patient preference. Informants will be obtained through theoretical sampling of those individuals willing to participate in this study. As part of the theoretical sampling procedures, informants will include those women admitted to the hospital for a first time cardiac event as well as women who have had multiple admissions for cardiac events. Methodology: An exploratory, longitudinal, qualitative research process will be followed using a grounded theory approach. Qualitative methodology will allow for the collection of in-depth information related to women's recovery. Analysis: Analysis of qualitative data will focus on the discovery of concepts which influence recovery and the exploration of the underlying relationships among the concepts identified. The constant comparison procedure will be used throughout data collection and analysis. Data will be jointly coded and analyzed to systematically generate theory. Preliminary results of data analysis will be shared.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLiving With Coronary Heart Disease (CHD): Women's Psychosocial Issuesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAmer, Kimen_US
dc.author.detailsKim Amer, PhD, Assistant Professor, DePaul University, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: kamer@wppost.depaul.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165922-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this ongoing qualitative study is to identify, describe and provide a theoretical analysis of the psychologic and social processes which contribute to women's recovery in coronary heart disease; specifically, those women who do not participate in outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Ultimately, the qualitative research process will provide a theoretical basis for the development, initiation, and evaluation of gender specific interventions designed to enhance recovery and rehabilitation in women. Background: Historically, rehabilitative issues related to coronary heart disease have typically focused on issues pertaining to men, with little attention given to the unique experiences of women recovering from cardiac illness or surgery. More women than men are dying of CHD; more than 500,000 women die from CHD each year, making the disease a major cause of morbidity and disability in women over age 50. A variety of psychosocial factors have been cited as risk factors for the development of heart disease, yet few studies have explored the nature of the stressors that occur following the onset of heart disease in women. As a result, there is no consensus on the defining characteristics of psychosocial rehabilitation or recovery following. Cardiac rehabilitation offers a comprehensive approach to managing manifestations of cardiovascular disease which impedes the progression of pathophysiological processes as well as enhance psychosocial well-being. However, only 11% to 15% of cardiac patients who are eligible participate in a cardiac rehabilitation program. Furthermore, the small percentage of women who participate in such programs have higher drop out rates than their male counterparts. The low participation and the high drop out rates of women may be secondary to the current rehabilitative guidelines which have been derived from studies of men. Sample: The sample will consist of approximately 20 English speaking female informants who have experienced a cardiac event. The target population for the research are women who are hospitalized with cardiac illness at a large teaching hospital and who are not planning to attend outpatient cardiac rehabilitation for reasons such as lack of insurance, lack of physician referral, or patient preference. Informants will be obtained through theoretical sampling of those individuals willing to participate in this study. As part of the theoretical sampling procedures, informants will include those women admitted to the hospital for a first time cardiac event as well as women who have had multiple admissions for cardiac events. Methodology: An exploratory, longitudinal, qualitative research process will be followed using a grounded theory approach. Qualitative methodology will allow for the collection of in-depth information related to women's recovery. Analysis: Analysis of qualitative data will focus on the discovery of concepts which influence recovery and the exploration of the underlying relationships among the concepts identified. The constant comparison procedure will be used throughout data collection and analysis. Data will be jointly coded and analyzed to systematically generate theory. Preliminary results of data analysis will be shared.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:32Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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