2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165924
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
"How Much" Touch For Preterm Infants?
Author(s):
Casalenuovo, Gregory
Author Details:
Gregory Casalenuovo, MSN, University of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, (updated February 2015) email: gcasalenuovo@cn.edu
Abstract:
Spitz (1945) believed that an infant could survive without the mother's voice, eyes, taste, and smell but would not survive if denied tactile contact such as handling, fondling, and caressing. Over the past decades, numerous studies have examined various types of touch in both full term and preterm infants. The benefits and potential adversive effects of touch have been of particular interest with the preterm population. The concern about the potentially adversive effects of touch on preterm infants has lead most neonatal intensive care units (NICU) to limit tactile stimulation and frequent handling of preterm infants. The purpose of this study was to replicate research to further determine the impact of the length of a gentle human touch (GHT) nursing intervention on the preterm infants' adaptation to extrauterine life utilizing the Roy Adaptation Model for nursing. Additionally, Roy's proposition linking "time" and "adaptation" was tested. Twenty-four infants (27 to 32 weeks gestational age) were randomly assigned to either a control or experimental group. The control group received routine NICU care. The experimental group received the routine NICU care and supplemental stimulation consisting of a GHT nursing intervention each morning from the fourth to thirteenth day of life. The touch intervention was conducted by a trained Registered Nurse and the data collection method, direct observation, was done by a trained research assistant. The following variables were examined: heart rate, oxygen saturation, sleep states, motor activity, and behavioral distress cues. Analysis of the experimental group data will be presented. Repeated measures ANOVA will be utilized to examine the differences between a 10-minute GHT nursing intervention and a 20 minute GHT nursing intervention for the experimental group. The preliminary results of this study support the findings of the previous work. The effects of a gentle human touch nursing intervention for preterm infants were not contraindicated for this sample. These preliminary findings support positive and beneficial effects of a 20-minute GHT nursing intervention. These data also suggest that "time" may be a concept for consideration when utilizing touch interventions to assist preterm infants in adaptation to extrauterine life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title"How Much" Touch For Preterm Infants?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCasalenuovo, Gregoryen_US
dc.author.detailsGregory Casalenuovo, MSN, University of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, (updated February 2015) email: gcasalenuovo@cn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165924-
dc.description.abstractSpitz (1945) believed that an infant could survive without the mother's voice, eyes, taste, and smell but would not survive if denied tactile contact such as handling, fondling, and caressing. Over the past decades, numerous studies have examined various types of touch in both full term and preterm infants. The benefits and potential adversive effects of touch have been of particular interest with the preterm population. The concern about the potentially adversive effects of touch on preterm infants has lead most neonatal intensive care units (NICU) to limit tactile stimulation and frequent handling of preterm infants. The purpose of this study was to replicate research to further determine the impact of the length of a gentle human touch (GHT) nursing intervention on the preterm infants' adaptation to extrauterine life utilizing the Roy Adaptation Model for nursing. Additionally, Roy's proposition linking "time" and "adaptation" was tested. Twenty-four infants (27 to 32 weeks gestational age) were randomly assigned to either a control or experimental group. The control group received routine NICU care. The experimental group received the routine NICU care and supplemental stimulation consisting of a GHT nursing intervention each morning from the fourth to thirteenth day of life. The touch intervention was conducted by a trained Registered Nurse and the data collection method, direct observation, was done by a trained research assistant. The following variables were examined: heart rate, oxygen saturation, sleep states, motor activity, and behavioral distress cues. Analysis of the experimental group data will be presented. Repeated measures ANOVA will be utilized to examine the differences between a 10-minute GHT nursing intervention and a 20 minute GHT nursing intervention for the experimental group. The preliminary results of this study support the findings of the previous work. The effects of a gentle human touch nursing intervention for preterm infants were not contraindicated for this sample. These preliminary findings support positive and beneficial effects of a 20-minute GHT nursing intervention. These data also suggest that "time" may be a concept for consideration when utilizing touch interventions to assist preterm infants in adaptation to extrauterine life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:35Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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