2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165925
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Oklahoma Birth Trends: A Time-series Analysis
Author(s):
Cesario, Sandra
Author Details:
Sandra Cesario, MS, Assistant Professor, University of Oklahoma, Claremore, Oklahoma, USA, email: Sandy-Cesario@ouhsc.edu
Abstract:
Birth trends reflect & variety of social, cultural, meteorologic, economic, individual, and health-related variables in a specified population (Masih & Masih, 1997). Examination of birth trends for dynamic patterns which occur over time and across sociodemographically diverse regions of Oklahoma facilitates identification of community characteristics, needs, and responses to conditions, events, and policies. The purpose of this study is to examine the dynamics of the time-series of births to women in Oklahoma from 1980 through 1995. Chaos Theory supports the investigation of the complex nonlinear processes occurring in birth trend data, allowing patterns to be modeled with relatively few variables (Brown, l995). Chaos Theory assists the researcher in identifying the dominant forces that account for multicausal, nonlinear dynamics or the apparent randomly changing trend in births in Oklahoma (Hamilton, 1997). The sample consists of daily birth rates obtained from birth certificate data. The data set includes age and race of the mother, age and race of the father, marital status, and the county in which the pregnancy occurred. The graphic representation of time-series data is the method selected to describe the patterns of birth trends. Autocorrelations and plots of the autocorrelation function provide descriptive and statistical methods to reveal the structure of the deterministic cycle component, allows the investigator to test hypotheses, and facilitates understanding of pattern changes following intervention (Taylor, 1990).
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOklahoma Birth Trends: A Time-series Analysisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCesario, Sandraen_US
dc.author.detailsSandra Cesario, MS, Assistant Professor, University of Oklahoma, Claremore, Oklahoma, USA, email: Sandy-Cesario@ouhsc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165925-
dc.description.abstractBirth trends reflect & variety of social, cultural, meteorologic, economic, individual, and health-related variables in a specified population (Masih & Masih, 1997). Examination of birth trends for dynamic patterns which occur over time and across sociodemographically diverse regions of Oklahoma facilitates identification of community characteristics, needs, and responses to conditions, events, and policies. The purpose of this study is to examine the dynamics of the time-series of births to women in Oklahoma from 1980 through 1995. Chaos Theory supports the investigation of the complex nonlinear processes occurring in birth trend data, allowing patterns to be modeled with relatively few variables (Brown, l995). Chaos Theory assists the researcher in identifying the dominant forces that account for multicausal, nonlinear dynamics or the apparent randomly changing trend in births in Oklahoma (Hamilton, 1997). The sample consists of daily birth rates obtained from birth certificate data. The data set includes age and race of the mother, age and race of the father, marital status, and the county in which the pregnancy occurred. The graphic representation of time-series data is the method selected to describe the patterns of birth trends. Autocorrelations and plots of the autocorrelation function provide descriptive and statistical methods to reveal the structure of the deterministic cycle component, allows the investigator to test hypotheses, and facilitates understanding of pattern changes following intervention (Taylor, 1990).en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:36Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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