2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165929
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining Self-esteem In A Non-clinical Youth Sample
Author(s):
Ehrenberger, Heidi
Author Details:
Heidi Ehrenberger, PhD, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, email: ehrenber@utkuy.utk.edu
Abstract:
Low self-esteem has been linked to adolescent risk behaviors such as smoking, drug use, and sexual activity resulting in early pregnancy. Girls with low self-esteem in early adolescence may suffer from depression, anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and sexually transmitted diseases. Children of alcoholics may have feelings - of low self-esteem and anger. Gender also has been cited by some as a differentiating factor in self-esteem. Given the significance of self-esteem in adolescence, an exploratory correlational design was used to examine the existence and correlates of self-esteem in a non-clinical youth sample ages 12-19. The Roy Adaptation Model was used to guide the study. The instruments used to measure self-esteem and other variables in the study were the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (SEI), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), the Child of an Alcoholic Screening Test (CAST), and the Spielberger State-trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI). A demographic form to elicit information about lifestyle factors was also used. Participants from this study represented a convenience sample of adolescents who participated in youth activities at a large southeastern church (N=140). The mean self-esteem score was high at 70.68 (range 0 to 100). There was no significant difference of self-esteem between male and female adolescents (p=.578). There was a significant relationship between self-esteem and exercise (p=.007) and self-esteem and stress (p=.004). There was no significant relationship between self-report of self-esteem and smoking. There was also no significant relationship between the subjects' self-esteem and self-report of attitudes, feelings, perceptions, and experiences related to their parents' drinking behavior. A significant inverse relationship was found between the self-report of self-esteem and the score on the BDI and self-esteem and anger expression. The youth sample in this study reported high self-esteem and provided a portrait of the well (non-clinical) adolescent. Nurses in the community can foster and develop these portraits by promoting lifestyle factors that increase self-esteem which may moderate anger and stress. The role of structured social groups such as a church youth group or another type of youth group remains to be investigated. Longitudinal studies may be useful in obtaining a comprehensive view of self-esteem in children and adolescents.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining Self-esteem In A Non-clinical Youth Sampleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEhrenberger, Heidien_US
dc.author.detailsHeidi Ehrenberger, PhD, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, email: ehrenber@utkuy.utk.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165929-
dc.description.abstractLow self-esteem has been linked to adolescent risk behaviors such as smoking, drug use, and sexual activity resulting in early pregnancy. Girls with low self-esteem in early adolescence may suffer from depression, anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and sexually transmitted diseases. Children of alcoholics may have feelings - of low self-esteem and anger. Gender also has been cited by some as a differentiating factor in self-esteem. Given the significance of self-esteem in adolescence, an exploratory correlational design was used to examine the existence and correlates of self-esteem in a non-clinical youth sample ages 12-19. The Roy Adaptation Model was used to guide the study. The instruments used to measure self-esteem and other variables in the study were the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory (SEI), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), the Child of an Alcoholic Screening Test (CAST), and the Spielberger State-trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI). A demographic form to elicit information about lifestyle factors was also used. Participants from this study represented a convenience sample of adolescents who participated in youth activities at a large southeastern church (N=140). The mean self-esteem score was high at 70.68 (range 0 to 100). There was no significant difference of self-esteem between male and female adolescents (p=.578). There was a significant relationship between self-esteem and exercise (p=.007) and self-esteem and stress (p=.004). There was no significant relationship between self-report of self-esteem and smoking. There was also no significant relationship between the subjects' self-esteem and self-report of attitudes, feelings, perceptions, and experiences related to their parents' drinking behavior. A significant inverse relationship was found between the self-report of self-esteem and the score on the BDI and self-esteem and anger expression. The youth sample in this study reported high self-esteem and provided a portrait of the well (non-clinical) adolescent. Nurses in the community can foster and develop these portraits by promoting lifestyle factors that increase self-esteem which may moderate anger and stress. The role of structured social groups such as a church youth group or another type of youth group remains to be investigated. Longitudinal studies may be useful in obtaining a comprehensive view of self-esteem in children and adolescents.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:41Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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