Gay Men And Lesbians' Patterns Of Disclosure Of Sexual Orientation To Healthcare Providers And Their Knowledge, Beliefs, And Attitudes About HIV

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165930
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gay Men And Lesbians' Patterns Of Disclosure Of Sexual Orientation To Healthcare Providers And Their Knowledge, Beliefs, And Attitudes About HIV
Author(s):
Fogel, Sarah
Author Details:
Sarah Fogel, MSN, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: sarah.fogel@vanderbilt.edu
Abstract:
Population-based care is rapidly becoming the focus of many nursing interventions targeted for health promotion and risk prevention strategies. The purpose of this study is to investigate the differences between gay men and lesbians' histories of and contributing reasons for disclosure of sexual orientation to healthcare providers and their knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes about HIV and HIV transmission. A convenience sample of gay men and lesbians is being recruited from a metropolitan center for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and trans-gender populations. The sample is limited to individuals over the age of 18 and although a target sample size of 100 is proposed, no maximum limit has been set for the total number of subjects who will be included. Data will be collected over 18 months; beginning in November 1997. Subjects are being recruited through the center's mailing list, posters, community bulletin boards, and word of mouth. After informed consent is obtained, participants will be interviewed by one of the co-investigators. A survey design using structured interviews and focus groups is being used to collect data. Interviews will focus on subjects' history of and contributing factors for disclosure of sexual preference to primary healthcare provider and their knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about HIV and HIV transmission. Subjects will be asked to complete a set of questions from the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics National Health Interview Survey, which has established reliability and validity estimates for minority populations. An additional questionnaire focusing on disclosure of sexual orientation is being developed and will undergo psychometric testing with a pilot sample of ten subjects prior to use in the full study. Focus group sessions will focus on aspects of disclosure of sexual orientation to healthcare providers and perceived risk of HIV. Questionnaire data will be analyzed using correlational and group comparison (ANOVA) techniques. Qualitative data from focus groups will be analyzed for themes and assessed for differences across groups. Qualitative and quantitative data findings will then be compared for evidence of consistency or inconsistency in responses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGay Men And Lesbians' Patterns Of Disclosure Of Sexual Orientation To Healthcare Providers And Their Knowledge, Beliefs, And Attitudes About HIVen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFogel, Sarahen_US
dc.author.detailsSarah Fogel, MSN, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: sarah.fogel@vanderbilt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165930-
dc.description.abstractPopulation-based care is rapidly becoming the focus of many nursing interventions targeted for health promotion and risk prevention strategies. The purpose of this study is to investigate the differences between gay men and lesbians' histories of and contributing reasons for disclosure of sexual orientation to healthcare providers and their knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes about HIV and HIV transmission. A convenience sample of gay men and lesbians is being recruited from a metropolitan center for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and trans-gender populations. The sample is limited to individuals over the age of 18 and although a target sample size of 100 is proposed, no maximum limit has been set for the total number of subjects who will be included. Data will be collected over 18 months; beginning in November 1997. Subjects are being recruited through the center's mailing list, posters, community bulletin boards, and word of mouth. After informed consent is obtained, participants will be interviewed by one of the co-investigators. A survey design using structured interviews and focus groups is being used to collect data. Interviews will focus on subjects' history of and contributing factors for disclosure of sexual preference to primary healthcare provider and their knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about HIV and HIV transmission. Subjects will be asked to complete a set of questions from the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics National Health Interview Survey, which has established reliability and validity estimates for minority populations. An additional questionnaire focusing on disclosure of sexual orientation is being developed and will undergo psychometric testing with a pilot sample of ten subjects prior to use in the full study. Focus group sessions will focus on aspects of disclosure of sexual orientation to healthcare providers and perceived risk of HIV. Questionnaire data will be analyzed using correlational and group comparison (ANOVA) techniques. Qualitative data from focus groups will be analyzed for themes and assessed for differences across groups. Qualitative and quantitative data findings will then be compared for evidence of consistency or inconsistency in responses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:42Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.