Identifying Components For A Measure Of Social Support In African Americans With Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165935
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Identifying Components For A Measure Of Social Support In African Americans With Cancer
Author(s):
Hamilton-Spruill, Jill
Author Details:
Jill Hamilton-Spruill, MSN, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, (updated February 2015) email: jbhamil@emory.edu
Abstract:
While many researchers have examined the benefits of social support, our knowledge of social support for African Americans with cancer is limited since studies have focused primarily on white subjects. While this pattern of sampling limits generalization of findings (Roberts, et al., 1996), it is of greater importance to note that instruments used in these studies may lack cultural sensitivity. Measures which have established reliability and validity on primarily white, middle class samples lack cultural sensitivity with African Americans with health problems (Stewart, 1993). Additionally, variables operationalized with white persons may have different meanings with African Americans diagnosed with cancer. This was found in at least one study that examined social support in a group of socioeconomically disadvantaged black women with breast cancer (Guillory, 1992). Therefore, a culturally sensitive measure of social support for African Americans with cancer is needed, not only to contribute to our knowledge of social support to this population, but to accurately guide intervention studies. This poster presentation is part of an ongoing study to develop a relevant measure of social support to be used in research with African Americans diagnosed with cancer. The purpose of this preliminary qualitative study, guided by grounded theory (Strauss & Corbin, 1990), is to determine the components of social support for African Americans with cancer. To date, 11 African American women with breast cancer have been interviewed. The semi-structured interviews were conducted during home visits and ranged from 40 to 90 minutes in length. The data are being analyzed by the constant comparative method (Strauss & Corbin, 1990). Some emerging components of social support inthis initial sample of African American women with breast cancer are: 1) Claiming It--helped by God's healing powers; 2) Giving To Others--helped by an inner strength and determination to survive, and, being needed by others; 3) Togetherness--helped by group actions to share the burden; 4) Checking It Out--helped by validating medical information received with significant others; 5) Offerings--offers of prayers, money, paying of bills, food, transportation, cooking, and housework from an extended family of friends, neighbors, and church members. Once data saturation has been achieved with these African American women with breast cancer, a second qualitative study will be conducted to determine the components of social support in a sample of African American men with prostate cancer. From these preliminary qualitative data, items for a culturally relevant instrument of social support will be developed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIdentifying Components For A Measure Of Social Support In African Americans With Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorHamilton-Spruill, Jillen_US
dc.author.detailsJill Hamilton-Spruill, MSN, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, (updated February 2015) email: jbhamil@emory.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165935-
dc.description.abstractWhile many researchers have examined the benefits of social support, our knowledge of social support for African Americans with cancer is limited since studies have focused primarily on white subjects. While this pattern of sampling limits generalization of findings (Roberts, et al., 1996), it is of greater importance to note that instruments used in these studies may lack cultural sensitivity. Measures which have established reliability and validity on primarily white, middle class samples lack cultural sensitivity with African Americans with health problems (Stewart, 1993). Additionally, variables operationalized with white persons may have different meanings with African Americans diagnosed with cancer. This was found in at least one study that examined social support in a group of socioeconomically disadvantaged black women with breast cancer (Guillory, 1992). Therefore, a culturally sensitive measure of social support for African Americans with cancer is needed, not only to contribute to our knowledge of social support to this population, but to accurately guide intervention studies. This poster presentation is part of an ongoing study to develop a relevant measure of social support to be used in research with African Americans diagnosed with cancer. The purpose of this preliminary qualitative study, guided by grounded theory (Strauss & Corbin, 1990), is to determine the components of social support for African Americans with cancer. To date, 11 African American women with breast cancer have been interviewed. The semi-structured interviews were conducted during home visits and ranged from 40 to 90 minutes in length. The data are being analyzed by the constant comparative method (Strauss & Corbin, 1990). Some emerging components of social support inthis initial sample of African American women with breast cancer are: 1) Claiming It--helped by God's healing powers; 2) Giving To Others--helped by an inner strength and determination to survive, and, being needed by others; 3) Togetherness--helped by group actions to share the burden; 4) Checking It Out--helped by validating medical information received with significant others; 5) Offerings--offers of prayers, money, paying of bills, food, transportation, cooking, and housework from an extended family of friends, neighbors, and church members. Once data saturation has been achieved with these African American women with breast cancer, a second qualitative study will be conducted to determine the components of social support in a sample of African American men with prostate cancer. From these preliminary qualitative data, items for a culturally relevant instrument of social support will be developed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:49Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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