Wading Through The Quality Of Life Quagmire: Clarification And Integration Of Similar Concepts

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165936
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Wading Through The Quality Of Life Quagmire: Clarification And Integration Of Similar Concepts
Author(s):
Haas, Barbara
Author Details:
Barbara Haas, MSN, Associate Professor, University of Texas at Tyler College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Tyler, Texas, USA, email: bhaas@mail.uttyl.edu
Abstract:
As new cancer treatments have successfully extended length of life, there has been increased demand for evaluation of the quality of the time that has resulted from increased survival. The side effects associated with some therapeutic procedures and the sacrifices required for increased length of life have accentuated the need to not only consider survival, but also the quality of life (QOL) of the individual. Since l993 there have been over 4,000 articles published on QOL related to health, more than 1 of which involved patients with cancer. Reviewing the numerous articles related to QOL is difficult due to the multiple interpretations and measurements of QOL. Quality of life is a complex, multifaceted concept which, though used in everyday language, has continued to defy consensual definition. The purpose of the current paper was to examine the ways in which QOL is used in nursing practice and research and to develop a model which delineated QOL from closely related concepts, including well-being, satisfaction with life, functional status, and health. A review of the literature revealed several conceptual and methodological issues surrounding QOL and closely related concepts. These are summarized as follows: 1. Functional status is often interpreted as physical functioning. This explication of functional status is discrepant with the definition provided by those well versed in that literature. Functional status, like QOL and well-being, is concerned with all dimensions of life. It focuses on objective indicators. 2. Satisfaction with life is a purely subjective indicator and only represents one attribute of well-being and QOL. It is not synonymous with QOL. 3. Well-being is often interpreted as referring to psychological or emotional factors. Based on concept analysis, this interpretation is too narrow. Like functional status and QOL, well-being is concerned with all dimensions of life. Like satisfaction with life, it is a subjective assessment. 4. Health is defined by many as being dichotomous with illness. This is contrary to the definition provided by persons experiencing life-threatening illness and to the experience of many in nursing. It is unclear at this point if QOL is a determinant of health or if health is a component of QOL. 5. Measurement of QOL is often incongruent with the multidimensional nature of the concept. Researchers frequently measure one component of QOL (well-being or functional status) and report it as a measure of overall QOL without specifying they are focusing on the subjective or objective nature of QOL. Others measure one aspect of one dimension of QOL (such as symptom distress) but refer to it as a measure of overall QOL. In an attempt to clarify these conceptual issues, a model was developed in which the relationships among the concepts of QOL, well -being, satisfaction with life, and functional status are delineated. Quality of life is envisioned as a broad concept which has both subjective and objective components. The subjective component, often referred to as well-being is considered the primary indicator of QOL. However, the objective component, represented by functional capacity, is also a critical attribute of QOL. Satisfaction with life, which is a subjective assessment, is one hallmark of well-being and thus also an attribute of QOL. Quality of life is comprised of four domains which, though they may vary slightly generally are identified as physical, psychological, social, and spiritual dimensions. A definition of QOL is also provided.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWading Through The Quality Of Life Quagmire: Clarification And Integration Of Similar Conceptsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHaas, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Haas, MSN, Associate Professor, University of Texas at Tyler College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Tyler, Texas, USA, email: bhaas@mail.uttyl.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165936-
dc.description.abstractAs new cancer treatments have successfully extended length of life, there has been increased demand for evaluation of the quality of the time that has resulted from increased survival. The side effects associated with some therapeutic procedures and the sacrifices required for increased length of life have accentuated the need to not only consider survival, but also the quality of life (QOL) of the individual. Since l993 there have been over 4,000 articles published on QOL related to health, more than 1 of which involved patients with cancer. Reviewing the numerous articles related to QOL is difficult due to the multiple interpretations and measurements of QOL. Quality of life is a complex, multifaceted concept which, though used in everyday language, has continued to defy consensual definition. The purpose of the current paper was to examine the ways in which QOL is used in nursing practice and research and to develop a model which delineated QOL from closely related concepts, including well-being, satisfaction with life, functional status, and health. A review of the literature revealed several conceptual and methodological issues surrounding QOL and closely related concepts. These are summarized as follows: 1. Functional status is often interpreted as physical functioning. This explication of functional status is discrepant with the definition provided by those well versed in that literature. Functional status, like QOL and well-being, is concerned with all dimensions of life. It focuses on objective indicators. 2. Satisfaction with life is a purely subjective indicator and only represents one attribute of well-being and QOL. It is not synonymous with QOL. 3. Well-being is often interpreted as referring to psychological or emotional factors. Based on concept analysis, this interpretation is too narrow. Like functional status and QOL, well-being is concerned with all dimensions of life. Like satisfaction with life, it is a subjective assessment. 4. Health is defined by many as being dichotomous with illness. This is contrary to the definition provided by persons experiencing life-threatening illness and to the experience of many in nursing. It is unclear at this point if QOL is a determinant of health or if health is a component of QOL. 5. Measurement of QOL is often incongruent with the multidimensional nature of the concept. Researchers frequently measure one component of QOL (well-being or functional status) and report it as a measure of overall QOL without specifying they are focusing on the subjective or objective nature of QOL. Others measure one aspect of one dimension of QOL (such as symptom distress) but refer to it as a measure of overall QOL. In an attempt to clarify these conceptual issues, a model was developed in which the relationships among the concepts of QOL, well -being, satisfaction with life, and functional status are delineated. Quality of life is envisioned as a broad concept which has both subjective and objective components. The subjective component, often referred to as well-being is considered the primary indicator of QOL. However, the objective component, represented by functional capacity, is also a critical attribute of QOL. Satisfaction with life, which is a subjective assessment, is one hallmark of well-being and thus also an attribute of QOL. Quality of life is comprised of four domains which, though they may vary slightly generally are identified as physical, psychological, social, and spiritual dimensions. A definition of QOL is also provided.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:50Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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