2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165939
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors Of Leisure-time Physical Activity Among Adult Native-American Women
Author(s):
Huchteman, Elena
Author Details:
Elena Huchteman, MS/MSc, Texas Women's University, Denton, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: Elena-Cuaderes@ouhsc.edu
Abstract:
For some populations, including Native-American adults, sedentarianism poses a serious health risk. Current explanations of an adult person's health in terms of exercise have been based primarily on the caucasian population, either in young adult or midlife males or young adult females. The time has come to study adult, Native-American women and to investigate variables that might impact their motivation to regularly exercise. Information from this study can contribute to future research into the exercise patterns of adult Native-American women and their specific needs about exercise programs. The purpose of this study is to examine whether physical self -efficacy, self-motivation and perceived exercise barriers and benefits are related to and predict physical activity patterns in the adult Native-American woman. Because women of five different tribes are to be examined, this research will also attempt to find any differences between the tribes. A framework, developed by the investigator, was adapted from the Health Promotion Model by N. Pender and the work of R. Dishman, W. Ickes and W. Morgan who developed the Self -Motivation Inventory. It is hypothesized that self-motivation, physical self-efficacy and exercise benefits are positively associated and predict regular physical activity and exercise barriers are negatively associated and predict regular physical activity. It is also hypothesized that there are no differences between the five different tribes of Native-American women regarding these motivators for regular exercise. This study will examine these hypotheses by the use of quantitative tools to measure the independent variables and the use of a qualitative tool to measure the dependent variable.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors Of Leisure-time Physical Activity Among Adult Native-American Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHuchteman, Elenaen_US
dc.author.detailsElena Huchteman, MS/MSc, Texas Women's University, Denton, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: Elena-Cuaderes@ouhsc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165939-
dc.description.abstractFor some populations, including Native-American adults, sedentarianism poses a serious health risk. Current explanations of an adult person's health in terms of exercise have been based primarily on the caucasian population, either in young adult or midlife males or young adult females. The time has come to study adult, Native-American women and to investigate variables that might impact their motivation to regularly exercise. Information from this study can contribute to future research into the exercise patterns of adult Native-American women and their specific needs about exercise programs. The purpose of this study is to examine whether physical self -efficacy, self-motivation and perceived exercise barriers and benefits are related to and predict physical activity patterns in the adult Native-American woman. Because women of five different tribes are to be examined, this research will also attempt to find any differences between the tribes. A framework, developed by the investigator, was adapted from the Health Promotion Model by N. Pender and the work of R. Dishman, W. Ickes and W. Morgan who developed the Self -Motivation Inventory. It is hypothesized that self-motivation, physical self-efficacy and exercise benefits are positively associated and predict regular physical activity and exercise barriers are negatively associated and predict regular physical activity. It is also hypothesized that there are no differences between the five different tribes of Native-American women regarding these motivators for regular exercise. This study will examine these hypotheses by the use of quantitative tools to measure the independent variables and the use of a qualitative tool to measure the dependent variable.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:54Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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