2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165941
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Depression In Our Youth: How Common Is It?
Author(s):
Jesse, Darlene
Author Details:
Darlene Jesse, Assistant Professor, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA, email: ejesse@purdue.edu
Abstract:
Mental disorders are a major cause of disability among our youth 12-19 years of age. Depression stands out among the mental disorders because of its impact on childhood and adolescent adjustment. It is important to determine the existence of depression in our youth and to understand the antecedents and correlates associated with the existence of this depression. The purpose of this study was to examine: (a) the existence of self-reported levels of depression in a non-clinical sample of early, mid and late adolescent groups, and (b) the relationship of adolescent depression to self-esteem, anger, feelings about parental alcohol use, and selected demographic characteristics. The Roy Adaptation Model was used to guide this study. The child and adolescent sample (N=140) was drawn from a community church group in a southeastern state and was divided into early, mid, and late adolescent groups. The instruments used to measure depression and other variables in this study included the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), Coopersmith's Self-Esteem Inventory, Child of an Alcoholic Screening Test (CAST), Spielberger' s State-trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI) scale, and a demographic form. Mean self-reported depression scores for all adolescent groups were low. Findings from preliminary results show (a) no significant difference in self-reported levels of depression between boys and girls in the early and mid-adolescent groups (p>.05); however, adolescent girls scored higher on self-reported depression than boys in late adolescence (p<.05); (b) self-reported depression for all adolescent groups were significantly associated with self-esteem (p<.05); and (c) early and mid adolescent group levels of depression were not significantly associated with anger, whereas late adolescent group levels of depression were associated with anger. Increasing levels of self-reported depression were associated with decreased self-esteem in all groups and increased anger in late adolescent groups, combined with increased levels of depression in late adolescent girls, suggests a profile for nurses and other health professionals to recognize adolescents who are at risk for depression. This knowledge may lead to appropriate nursing interventions to help adolescents turn this period of great risk into one of opportunity. Future recommendations include replication with diverse samples, evaluation of instrumentation, and continued research to enhance understanding of the interrelations among health risk and health promoting behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDepression In Our Youth: How Common Is It?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorJesse, Darleneen_US
dc.author.detailsDarlene Jesse, Assistant Professor, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA, email: ejesse@purdue.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165941-
dc.description.abstractMental disorders are a major cause of disability among our youth 12-19 years of age. Depression stands out among the mental disorders because of its impact on childhood and adolescent adjustment. It is important to determine the existence of depression in our youth and to understand the antecedents and correlates associated with the existence of this depression. The purpose of this study was to examine: (a) the existence of self-reported levels of depression in a non-clinical sample of early, mid and late adolescent groups, and (b) the relationship of adolescent depression to self-esteem, anger, feelings about parental alcohol use, and selected demographic characteristics. The Roy Adaptation Model was used to guide this study. The child and adolescent sample (N=140) was drawn from a community church group in a southeastern state and was divided into early, mid, and late adolescent groups. The instruments used to measure depression and other variables in this study included the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Children's Depression Inventory (CDI), Coopersmith's Self-Esteem Inventory, Child of an Alcoholic Screening Test (CAST), Spielberger' s State-trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI) scale, and a demographic form. Mean self-reported depression scores for all adolescent groups were low. Findings from preliminary results show (a) no significant difference in self-reported levels of depression between boys and girls in the early and mid-adolescent groups (p>.05); however, adolescent girls scored higher on self-reported depression than boys in late adolescence (p<.05); (b) self-reported depression for all adolescent groups were significantly associated with self-esteem (p<.05); and (c) early and mid adolescent group levels of depression were not significantly associated with anger, whereas late adolescent group levels of depression were associated with anger. Increasing levels of self-reported depression were associated with decreased self-esteem in all groups and increased anger in late adolescent groups, combined with increased levels of depression in late adolescent girls, suggests a profile for nurses and other health professionals to recognize adolescents who are at risk for depression. This knowledge may lead to appropriate nursing interventions to help adolescents turn this period of great risk into one of opportunity. Future recommendations include replication with diverse samples, evaluation of instrumentation, and continued research to enhance understanding of the interrelations among health risk and health promoting behaviors.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:36:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:36:57Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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