2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165945
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Racial Differences In Family Structure Related To Initiation Of Prenatal Care
Author(s):
McComb, Tara
Author Details:
Tara McComb, MSN, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, (updated February 2015) email: thulsey@csuniv.edu
Abstract:
Many women in the United States continue to receive late or no prenatal care despite the fact that prenatal care has been associated with improved perinatal outcomes. A demographic characteristic that has been associated with late/no prenatal care is having a greater number of children living in the home. This nonconcurrent prospective study examined racial (White/Black and other) differences in the family structure component related to initiation of prenatal care. Hospital delivery records of all women covered by Medicaid delivering at a Level III regional perinatal center on the coast of South Carolina were individually abstracted for the year 1996, (n = 1749). Information on the number of children (5yr.), minors (6-1 2yr), adolescents (13-1 8yr), and adults living in the home during the pregnancy period comprised the family structure component. Prenatal care was explored based on trimester of entry into care. It was hypothesized that in women receiving late/no prenatal care, the family structure would differ by race (white/black and other). To test this hypothesis a series of Chi Square analyses as well as logistic regression were performed. Results suggest that nonwhite Medicaid women are 2.2 times (p=.007) more likely than White Medicaid women to receive late/no prenatal care. In addition, there was a significant association between women with an increased number of children living in the home and late/no prenatal care regardless of race (p=.001 for White, p=.002 for Black and other). Also, the women receiving late/no prenatal care were 5.3 times more likely to have two or more children living in the home (p=.0001) regardless of their ethnic group. For both race categories the percent of late/no prenatal care increased with increases in the number of children present. Results imply an association between patterns of prenatal care utilization and family structure which were equivalent for both ethnic groups; however, the distribution of family structure components differed by race. Nonwhite families were more frequently characterized by a greater number of children, minors, adolescents, and other adults living in the home. Racial differences in prenatal care utilization were no longer significant when controlling for differences in family structure.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRacial Differences In Family Structure Related To Initiation Of Prenatal Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcComb, Taraen_US
dc.author.detailsTara McComb, MSN, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, (updated February 2015) email: thulsey@csuniv.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165945-
dc.description.abstractMany women in the United States continue to receive late or no prenatal care despite the fact that prenatal care has been associated with improved perinatal outcomes. A demographic characteristic that has been associated with late/no prenatal care is having a greater number of children living in the home. This nonconcurrent prospective study examined racial (White/Black and other) differences in the family structure component related to initiation of prenatal care. Hospital delivery records of all women covered by Medicaid delivering at a Level III regional perinatal center on the coast of South Carolina were individually abstracted for the year 1996, (n = 1749). Information on the number of children (5yr.), minors (6-1 2yr), adolescents (13-1 8yr), and adults living in the home during the pregnancy period comprised the family structure component. Prenatal care was explored based on trimester of entry into care. It was hypothesized that in women receiving late/no prenatal care, the family structure would differ by race (white/black and other). To test this hypothesis a series of Chi Square analyses as well as logistic regression were performed. Results suggest that nonwhite Medicaid women are 2.2 times (p=.007) more likely than White Medicaid women to receive late/no prenatal care. In addition, there was a significant association between women with an increased number of children living in the home and late/no prenatal care regardless of race (p=.001 for White, p=.002 for Black and other). Also, the women receiving late/no prenatal care were 5.3 times more likely to have two or more children living in the home (p=.0001) regardless of their ethnic group. For both race categories the percent of late/no prenatal care increased with increases in the number of children present. Results imply an association between patterns of prenatal care utilization and family structure which were equivalent for both ethnic groups; however, the distribution of family structure components differed by race. Nonwhite families were more frequently characterized by a greater number of children, minors, adolescents, and other adults living in the home. Racial differences in prenatal care utilization were no longer significant when controlling for differences in family structure.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:02Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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