2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165946
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Efficacy Of A Smoking Prevention Curriculum In Fifth-Grade Children
Author(s):
McGahee, Thayer
Author Details:
Thayer McGahee, PhD, Educator, Medical College of Georgia Department of Hospital & Clinics Education, Augusta, Georgia, USA, email: tmcgahee@mail.mcg.edu
Abstract:
More than 3,000 young people begin smoking each day in the United States. The age at which children begin to smoke is on a continual decline, with an estimated 60% of smokers beginning by age 13 and 90% having begun by age 20. The younger the age of smoking initiation, the less likely it is they will ever quit. The prevention of smoking needs to begin during childhood because of the early exposure to cigarette use, and the addictive nature of nicotine. The primary purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to examine the efficacy of a smoking prevention curriculum in fifth-grade children. The efficacy of this curriculum as an intervention was assessed by measuring both the child's intent to smoke by the end of the current school year. Two secondary purposes of this study were to determine (a) possible predictive variables of the child's intention to smoke and (b) the influence of the intervention on the child's attitudes, normative beliefs, and perceptions of refusal skills related to smoking. This study consisted of a minimum of 361 fifth-grade children from public schools in the southeast. The smoking prevention curriculum used in this study was a five-unit curriculum developed by the American Cancer Society to prevent smoking in children. It is a part of the "Do It Yourself - Making Healthy Choices" curriculum. The various internal factors addressed in this study were measured by an investigator-developed School-Age Smoking Questionnaire. It also measured the child's intention to smoke. Parental attitudes toward smoking were measured by the Smoking Attitude Scale developed by Gordon and Haynes. Other variables were measured by an investigator-developed sociodemographic questionnaire. This study utilized the Solomon four-group design. Participating schools were randomly assisnged to one of the four groups. Analysis of variance and t-tests for paired samples were used to analyze the differences in data from the four groups. Five research hypotheses were developed for this study. These were analyzed using ANOVA and multivariate correlation statistics. Results indicated that the smoking program was an effective intervention to decrease the intention to smoke in fifth-grade children (p=.000). The intervention to decrease the intention to smoke in fifth-grade children (p=.000), but was not significantly effective in changing normative beliefs and refusal skills. Attitude and refusal skills resulted as the best overall predictors of intention to smoke in children.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Efficacy Of A Smoking Prevention Curriculum In Fifth-Grade Childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGahee, Thayeren_US
dc.author.detailsThayer McGahee, PhD, Educator, Medical College of Georgia Department of Hospital & Clinics Education, Augusta, Georgia, USA, email: tmcgahee@mail.mcg.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165946-
dc.description.abstractMore than 3,000 young people begin smoking each day in the United States. The age at which children begin to smoke is on a continual decline, with an estimated 60% of smokers beginning by age 13 and 90% having begun by age 20. The younger the age of smoking initiation, the less likely it is they will ever quit. The prevention of smoking needs to begin during childhood because of the early exposure to cigarette use, and the addictive nature of nicotine. The primary purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to examine the efficacy of a smoking prevention curriculum in fifth-grade children. The efficacy of this curriculum as an intervention was assessed by measuring both the child's intent to smoke by the end of the current school year. Two secondary purposes of this study were to determine (a) possible predictive variables of the child's intention to smoke and (b) the influence of the intervention on the child's attitudes, normative beliefs, and perceptions of refusal skills related to smoking. This study consisted of a minimum of 361 fifth-grade children from public schools in the southeast. The smoking prevention curriculum used in this study was a five-unit curriculum developed by the American Cancer Society to prevent smoking in children. It is a part of the "Do It Yourself - Making Healthy Choices" curriculum. The various internal factors addressed in this study were measured by an investigator-developed School-Age Smoking Questionnaire. It also measured the child's intention to smoke. Parental attitudes toward smoking were measured by the Smoking Attitude Scale developed by Gordon and Haynes. Other variables were measured by an investigator-developed sociodemographic questionnaire. This study utilized the Solomon four-group design. Participating schools were randomly assisnged to one of the four groups. Analysis of variance and t-tests for paired samples were used to analyze the differences in data from the four groups. Five research hypotheses were developed for this study. These were analyzed using ANOVA and multivariate correlation statistics. Results indicated that the smoking program was an effective intervention to decrease the intention to smoke in fifth-grade children (p=.000). The intervention to decrease the intention to smoke in fifth-grade children (p=.000), but was not significantly effective in changing normative beliefs and refusal skills. Attitude and refusal skills resulted as the best overall predictors of intention to smoke in children.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:03Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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