The Relationship Of Nursing Care To Health Outcomes Of Preterm Infants: Testing A Theory Of Health Promotion For Preterm Infants Based On Levine's Conservation Model Of Nursing

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Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165947
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Relationship Of Nursing Care To Health Outcomes Of Preterm Infants: Testing A Theory Of Health Promotion For Preterm Infants Based On Levine's Conservation Model Of Nursing
Author(s):
Mefford, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Mefford, PhD, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, email: lmefford@utk.edu
Abstract:
Infants born prematurely are suddenly and often traumatically thrust from a secure home in the womb into a foreign world for which they are not yet adapted to survive. Despite the rapid technological advances of the past few decades, 11% of the annual live births in the United States continue to be preterm births, occurring prior to the completion of 37 weeks of gestation. In order to merely survive in the extrauterine environment, preterm infants must quickly complete a myriad of physiological adaptations involving all of the major organ systems; these adaptations must be completed in the harsh, "high-tech" environment of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The role of the neonatal intensive care nurse is to provide nursing care which both protects the infant from the harsh NICU environment and also supports the adaptive efforts of both the infant and the family during this period of crisis. In order to remain competitive in a changing health care market, hospitals must find ways to deliver high quality services with the least possible outlay of capital. Since nursing salaries comprise a large percentage of a hospital's expenses, it is essential that nursing research be conducted to document the relationship of nursing care to patient outcomes. The purpose of this descriptive study is to examine the relationship of nursing care to the health outcomes of preterm infants by testing a theory of health promotion for preterm infants derived from Levine's Conservation Model of Nursing. Levine's Conservation Model was selected as the framework for this study because the model's focus on how a person (or patient) uses the process of adaptation to achieve a state of wholeness (or health) through the conservation of energy, structural integrity, personal integrity, and social. integrity seems ideally suited to the plight of the preterm infant adapting to the extrauterine environment. The primary research question for this study is: How do the intensity of nursing care and the consistency of nursing caregivers relate to the health outcomes of preterm infants at the time of initial hospital discharge? A subsidiary research question is: How do the intensity of nursing care and the consistency of nursing caregivers relate to the utilization of health care resources by preterm infants during the initial hospital stay? These research questions will be addressed through the statistical technique of structural equation modeling. This study will contribute significantly to the discipline of nursing in three areas. First, it will contribute to the nursing knowledge base for both clinical nursing and for nursing administration. Second, it will use a holistic nursing theoretical perspective to examine the relationship of the environment to the developing preterm infant. Finally, it will contribute additional research findings documenting the relationship of nursing care to infant outcomes and to the utilization of health care resources.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Relationship Of Nursing Care To Health Outcomes Of Preterm Infants: Testing A Theory Of Health Promotion For Preterm Infants Based On Levine's Conservation Model Of Nursingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMefford, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Mefford, PhD, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA, email: lmefford@utk.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165947-
dc.description.abstractInfants born prematurely are suddenly and often traumatically thrust from a secure home in the womb into a foreign world for which they are not yet adapted to survive. Despite the rapid technological advances of the past few decades, 11% of the annual live births in the United States continue to be preterm births, occurring prior to the completion of 37 weeks of gestation. In order to merely survive in the extrauterine environment, preterm infants must quickly complete a myriad of physiological adaptations involving all of the major organ systems; these adaptations must be completed in the harsh, "high-tech" environment of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The role of the neonatal intensive care nurse is to provide nursing care which both protects the infant from the harsh NICU environment and also supports the adaptive efforts of both the infant and the family during this period of crisis. In order to remain competitive in a changing health care market, hospitals must find ways to deliver high quality services with the least possible outlay of capital. Since nursing salaries comprise a large percentage of a hospital's expenses, it is essential that nursing research be conducted to document the relationship of nursing care to patient outcomes. The purpose of this descriptive study is to examine the relationship of nursing care to the health outcomes of preterm infants by testing a theory of health promotion for preterm infants derived from Levine's Conservation Model of Nursing. Levine's Conservation Model was selected as the framework for this study because the model's focus on how a person (or patient) uses the process of adaptation to achieve a state of wholeness (or health) through the conservation of energy, structural integrity, personal integrity, and social. integrity seems ideally suited to the plight of the preterm infant adapting to the extrauterine environment. The primary research question for this study is: How do the intensity of nursing care and the consistency of nursing caregivers relate to the health outcomes of preterm infants at the time of initial hospital discharge? A subsidiary research question is: How do the intensity of nursing care and the consistency of nursing caregivers relate to the utilization of health care resources by preterm infants during the initial hospital stay? These research questions will be addressed through the statistical technique of structural equation modeling. This study will contribute significantly to the discipline of nursing in three areas. First, it will contribute to the nursing knowledge base for both clinical nursing and for nursing administration. Second, it will use a holistic nursing theoretical perspective to examine the relationship of the environment to the developing preterm infant. Finally, it will contribute additional research findings documenting the relationship of nursing care to infant outcomes and to the utilization of health care resources.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:04Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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