2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165948
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Food Pyramid Self-efficacy Scale
Author(s):
Moseley, Marthe
Author Details:
Marthe Moseley, PhD, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Critical Care, South Texas Veterans Health Care System: Audie L. Murphy Division, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: Marthe.Moseley@med.va.gov
Abstract:
New research on the impact of nutrition on aging shows how many of the risks for chronic disease are really due to suboptimal diets and nutrient intakes. Several factors are associated with inadequate nutrition in the elder: knowledge deficit, culture, functional disability; and poverty. Good nutrition promotes healthy aging and health practices in old age which contribute to feelings of well-being impacting overall functional status. 85% of older Americans have chronic diseases that could benefit from better nutrition. Nutrition is the key in prevention and management of disease. There is a relationship between what people eat and functional ability. Declining functions associated with aging are not inevitable consequences of age related disease, but influenced by environmental, cognitive and other personal factors, and behavioral factors. The other personal factors, self-efficacy is measured by the Food Pyramid Self-Efficacy Scale (FPSES). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the reliability and validity of the FPSES. The results will determine whether the FPSES is an empirical indicator for self-efficacy. Bandura's social cognitive theory provides a framework for analyzing motivation, thought, and action; whereby environmental events, cognitive and other personal factors, and behavior all operate as determinants to ascertain a person's actions. Self-efficacy measures for healthy eating have not been established. The FPSES was developed by the author, as no instrument exists to measure self-efficacy regarding food choices recommended from the food pyramid. The instrument is intended to measure self-efficacy in the elderly and is designed based on the format from other self-efficacy scales. Volunteers over the age of 64 will be subjects to determine test-retest reliability, coefficient alpha, content validity, and construct validity. Demographics will also be determined.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFood Pyramid Self-efficacy Scaleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoseley, Martheen_US
dc.author.detailsMarthe Moseley, PhD, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Critical Care, South Texas Veterans Health Care System: Audie L. Murphy Division, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: Marthe.Moseley@med.va.goven_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165948-
dc.description.abstractNew research on the impact of nutrition on aging shows how many of the risks for chronic disease are really due to suboptimal diets and nutrient intakes. Several factors are associated with inadequate nutrition in the elder: knowledge deficit, culture, functional disability; and poverty. Good nutrition promotes healthy aging and health practices in old age which contribute to feelings of well-being impacting overall functional status. 85% of older Americans have chronic diseases that could benefit from better nutrition. Nutrition is the key in prevention and management of disease. There is a relationship between what people eat and functional ability. Declining functions associated with aging are not inevitable consequences of age related disease, but influenced by environmental, cognitive and other personal factors, and behavioral factors. The other personal factors, self-efficacy is measured by the Food Pyramid Self-Efficacy Scale (FPSES). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the reliability and validity of the FPSES. The results will determine whether the FPSES is an empirical indicator for self-efficacy. Bandura's social cognitive theory provides a framework for analyzing motivation, thought, and action; whereby environmental events, cognitive and other personal factors, and behavior all operate as determinants to ascertain a person's actions. Self-efficacy measures for healthy eating have not been established. The FPSES was developed by the author, as no instrument exists to measure self-efficacy regarding food choices recommended from the food pyramid. The instrument is intended to measure self-efficacy in the elderly and is designed based on the format from other self-efficacy scales. Volunteers over the age of 64 will be subjects to determine test-retest reliability, coefficient alpha, content validity, and construct validity. Demographics will also be determined.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:05Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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