Music, A Cognitive Intervention And Its Potential Effect On Autonomic Response: A Pilot Project

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165954
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Music, A Cognitive Intervention And Its Potential Effect On Autonomic Response: A Pilot Project
Author(s):
Reilly, Maureen
Author Details:
Maureen Reilly, MHSc, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: REILLYM@UTHSCA.EDU
Abstract:
Implications The current attitude towards the use of holistic alternatives in health care provides a positive environment for innovative research. A cognitive therapy, music, has become a frequent subject of scientific review. Music has been categorized as part of a group of Mind Body interventions by the National Institute of Health's Institute of Alternative Medicine. The resurgence of interest in the benefit of music as a therapeutic intervention has resulted in an increased interest in the physiologic and psychologic changes that result with the therapy. External physiologic parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate) have provided the primary means for measurement of the effectiveness of interventions. Autonomic reactivity may provide a more precise measure of the effectiveness and duration of music interventions. Research in cardiology and exercise physiology have demonstrated definable changes in r-r variability in subjects reflecting the state of autonomic arousal of subjects. Measurement is done by analysis of the r-r segment of electrocardiographic tracing. This external, non invasive modality may provide a framework for measurement of not only immediate effectiveness but also duration of effectiveness of music interventions. Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of the methodology of measuring r-r variability in an elder population before during and after a music intervention. Research Question Is r-r variability a feasible methodology for measurement of autonomic reactivity before, during and after a music intervention? Subjects Ten subjects, aged 55 or older, in a lodger unit of a large tertiary facility. Methods A quasi experimental design, subjects in the experimental group are given a 20 minute music intervention (self selected audio tapes via audio cassette player) while resting in their hospital rooms. Blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate will be measured at 5 minute intervals for 20 minutes before, during, and 20 minutes after the music intervention. Control group subjects are monitored for 40 minutes while resting in bed. All subjects also record levels of anxiety by Visual Analogue Scale at the beginning of monitoring and at the end of the 20 minute post surveillance period. Findings This is research in progress. Implications This pilot project may demonstrate a new methodology for the measurement of music intervention effectiveness.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMusic, A Cognitive Intervention And Its Potential Effect On Autonomic Response: A Pilot Projecten_GB
dc.contributor.authorReilly, Maureenen_US
dc.author.detailsMaureen Reilly, MHSc, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: REILLYM@UTHSCA.EDUen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165954-
dc.description.abstractImplications The current attitude towards the use of holistic alternatives in health care provides a positive environment for innovative research. A cognitive therapy, music, has become a frequent subject of scientific review. Music has been categorized as part of a group of Mind Body interventions by the National Institute of Health's Institute of Alternative Medicine. The resurgence of interest in the benefit of music as a therapeutic intervention has resulted in an increased interest in the physiologic and psychologic changes that result with the therapy. External physiologic parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate) have provided the primary means for measurement of the effectiveness of interventions. Autonomic reactivity may provide a more precise measure of the effectiveness and duration of music interventions. Research in cardiology and exercise physiology have demonstrated definable changes in r-r variability in subjects reflecting the state of autonomic arousal of subjects. Measurement is done by analysis of the r-r segment of electrocardiographic tracing. This external, non invasive modality may provide a framework for measurement of not only immediate effectiveness but also duration of effectiveness of music interventions. Purpose The purpose of this study is to examine the feasibility of the methodology of measuring r-r variability in an elder population before during and after a music intervention. Research Question Is r-r variability a feasible methodology for measurement of autonomic reactivity before, during and after a music intervention? Subjects Ten subjects, aged 55 or older, in a lodger unit of a large tertiary facility. Methods A quasi experimental design, subjects in the experimental group are given a 20 minute music intervention (self selected audio tapes via audio cassette player) while resting in their hospital rooms. Blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate will be measured at 5 minute intervals for 20 minutes before, during, and 20 minutes after the music intervention. Control group subjects are monitored for 40 minutes while resting in bed. All subjects also record levels of anxiety by Visual Analogue Scale at the beginning of monitoring and at the end of the 20 minute post surveillance period. Findings This is research in progress. Implications This pilot project may demonstrate a new methodology for the measurement of music intervention effectiveness.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:12Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.