2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165959
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects Of Foot Reflexology On Anxiety And Pain In Patients With Cancer
Author(s):
Stephenson, Nancy
Author Details:
Nancy Stephenson, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, East Carolina University, School of Nursing, Greenville, North Carolina, USA, email: stephensonn@mail.ecu.edu
Abstract:
Nationwide, there are a large number of patients with cancer both at home and in institutions who experience anxiety and mild to severe pain without adequate relief. This quasi-experimental pre-post crossover design measured the effects of foot reflexology on anxiety and pain in patients with cancer. The Gate Control Theory of Pain and Mind-Body Healing assist to explain how foot reflexology treatments affect anxiety and pain in patients with cancer. This research used the Visual Analogue Scale for Anxiety and the Short-From McGill Pain Questionnaire to measure the difference in anxiety and pain in patients with cancer before and after foot reflexology. On an oncology inpatient unit, N=23 breast and lung cancer patients were selected during four days each week. Analyses with univariate procedures with the Signed Rank test of significance revealed a significant decrease in anxiety with an alpha level of .05 in breast and lung cancer groups and an alpha level of .001 for both types of cancer combined. A decrease in pain was found in the breast cancer patients in the intervention group pre/post pain scores on the VAS of the SFMPQ in comparison to the control group with an alpha level of .05. The intervention breast cancer group reported a significant decrease in pain in the descriptive words, present pain intensity, and VAS of the SFMPQ with an alpha level of .05. In the combined breast and lung cancer patients a decrease in pain was found following reflexology in the descriptive words, the present pain intensity with an alpha level of .05, and the VAS of the SFMPQ with an alpha level of .001. On the descriptive words of the SFMPQ, the combined groups of breast and lung cancer patients who received reflexology reported a significant decrease in pain in comparison to patients who did not receive reflexology. This non-pharmacological intervention provides a potentially cost-effective self-care approach for patients, families, and health care providers throughout the country in decreasing anxiety in patients with breast and lung cancer and a decrease in pain in patients with breast cancer.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects Of Foot Reflexology On Anxiety And Pain In Patients With Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorStephenson, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Stephenson, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE, East Carolina University, School of Nursing, Greenville, North Carolina, USA, email: stephensonn@mail.ecu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165959-
dc.description.abstractNationwide, there are a large number of patients with cancer both at home and in institutions who experience anxiety and mild to severe pain without adequate relief. This quasi-experimental pre-post crossover design measured the effects of foot reflexology on anxiety and pain in patients with cancer. The Gate Control Theory of Pain and Mind-Body Healing assist to explain how foot reflexology treatments affect anxiety and pain in patients with cancer. This research used the Visual Analogue Scale for Anxiety and the Short-From McGill Pain Questionnaire to measure the difference in anxiety and pain in patients with cancer before and after foot reflexology. On an oncology inpatient unit, N=23 breast and lung cancer patients were selected during four days each week. Analyses with univariate procedures with the Signed Rank test of significance revealed a significant decrease in anxiety with an alpha level of .05 in breast and lung cancer groups and an alpha level of .001 for both types of cancer combined. A decrease in pain was found in the breast cancer patients in the intervention group pre/post pain scores on the VAS of the SFMPQ in comparison to the control group with an alpha level of .05. The intervention breast cancer group reported a significant decrease in pain in the descriptive words, present pain intensity, and VAS of the SFMPQ with an alpha level of .05. In the combined breast and lung cancer patients a decrease in pain was found following reflexology in the descriptive words, the present pain intensity with an alpha level of .05, and the VAS of the SFMPQ with an alpha level of .001. On the descriptive words of the SFMPQ, the combined groups of breast and lung cancer patients who received reflexology reported a significant decrease in pain in comparison to patients who did not receive reflexology. This non-pharmacological intervention provides a potentially cost-effective self-care approach for patients, families, and health care providers throughout the country in decreasing anxiety in patients with breast and lung cancer and a decrease in pain in patients with breast cancer.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:19Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.