Comparison Of The BOD POD(r) Body Composition System To Bioelectric Impedance And Hydrostatic Weighing For The Assessment Of Body Composition In Healthy Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165962
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison Of The BOD POD(r) Body Composition System To Bioelectric Impedance And Hydrostatic Weighing For The Assessment Of Body Composition In Healthy Adults
Author(s):
Vollman, Michael
Author Details:
Michael Vollman, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: michael.vollman@vanderbilt.edu
Abstract:
Over the past decade, considerable attention has been paid to accurately measuring body composition in diverse populations. The BOD POD(r) Body Composition System (Life Measurement Instruments, Concord, CA) is being proposed as an air displacement plethysmograph that is accurate, comfortable, and less invasive than conventional body composition measurement techniques. The purpose of this study is to compare the accuracy of the BOD POD(r) against bioelectric impedance (BIA) and hydrostatic weighing (HW) procedures, which are established methods for assessing body composition in adults. A convenience sample (n=40) of healthy adults between the ages of 19-64 is being recruited from university health promotion facilities and the community. Fliers and word of mouth referrals are the primary methods for recruitment of a sample comprised of equal numbers of male and female volunteers. The design for the study is correlational. Data collection is occurring at two sites - the Clinical Research Center and the Dayani Health Promotion Center, both of which are located on the Vanderbilt University Medical Center campus. Once informed consent is obtained, body composition is measured by the BOD POD(r). BIA and HW measures are taken immediately thereafter. This non-randomized, standardized process for data collection is being used because of the requirements of the BOD POD(r) measurement technique. At least two consecutive measurements are taken with each method to maximize assessment of reliability. Data analysis of the sample is underway and should be completed by November 1997. Analysis procedures include correlational and regression techniques. Preliminary results of this study support the use of the BOD POD(r) Body Composition System as a safe and accurate method for assessing body composition. Future investigations should assess the reliability and validity of this new body composition technology for use in adults with differing somatotypes, ethnicities, and chronic illnesses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison Of The BOD POD(r) Body Composition System To Bioelectric Impedance And Hydrostatic Weighing For The Assessment Of Body Composition In Healthy Adultsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVollman, Michaelen_US
dc.author.detailsMichael Vollman, Vanderbilt University School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: michael.vollman@vanderbilt.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165962-
dc.description.abstractOver the past decade, considerable attention has been paid to accurately measuring body composition in diverse populations. The BOD POD(r) Body Composition System (Life Measurement Instruments, Concord, CA) is being proposed as an air displacement plethysmograph that is accurate, comfortable, and less invasive than conventional body composition measurement techniques. The purpose of this study is to compare the accuracy of the BOD POD(r) against bioelectric impedance (BIA) and hydrostatic weighing (HW) procedures, which are established methods for assessing body composition in adults. A convenience sample (n=40) of healthy adults between the ages of 19-64 is being recruited from university health promotion facilities and the community. Fliers and word of mouth referrals are the primary methods for recruitment of a sample comprised of equal numbers of male and female volunteers. The design for the study is correlational. Data collection is occurring at two sites - the Clinical Research Center and the Dayani Health Promotion Center, both of which are located on the Vanderbilt University Medical Center campus. Once informed consent is obtained, body composition is measured by the BOD POD(r). BIA and HW measures are taken immediately thereafter. This non-randomized, standardized process for data collection is being used because of the requirements of the BOD POD(r) measurement technique. At least two consecutive measurements are taken with each method to maximize assessment of reliability. Data analysis of the sample is underway and should be completed by November 1997. Analysis procedures include correlational and regression techniques. Preliminary results of this study support the use of the BOD POD(r) Body Composition System as a safe and accurate method for assessing body composition. Future investigations should assess the reliability and validity of this new body composition technology for use in adults with differing somatotypes, ethnicities, and chronic illnesses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:23Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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