The Effect Of Cardiac Rehabilitation On Quality Of Life, Anxiety, And Self-care In Coronary Artery Disease Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165963
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect Of Cardiac Rehabilitation On Quality Of Life, Anxiety, And Self-care In Coronary Artery Disease Patients
Author(s):
Wilkinson, Susan
Author Details:
Susan Wilkinson, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: susan.wilkinson@angelo.edu
Abstract:
Major lifestyle changes are required after a person experiences an acute coronary event. Rehabilitation programs for coronary artery disease patients are designed to assist the patient with these lifestyle changes by altering the survivor's self-care patterns and improve long-term physical and psychological outcomes. By coordinating education, counseling, and exercise programs, the nurse can help individuals move toward a maximal physiological, psychological, social and vocational recovery. This pilot study was designed to test the research plan of a study to explore the effect of cardiac rehabilitation program participation on anxiety, quality of life, and self-care among coronary artery disease patients. Fifteen patients (8 men and 7 women) with coronary artery disease aged 45-81 (mean age 64.06, SD±9. 11) were included in the pilot study sample. A pretest post-test design was used. Data was collected before initial participation in the cardiac rehabilitation program and again at the completion of the 12 week program. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to measure anxiety. Quality of life was measured with the Perceived Quality of Life Scale (PQOL). The Health Behavior Scale was used to measure performance of suggested self-care behaviors (modify diet, administer medications, manage stress, exercise, and reduce smoking). Initial pretest post-test findings included perceived quality of life (t = 0.54, p=0.599), state anxiety (t = 0.13, p = 0. 896),trait anxiety (t = 2.39, p = 0.032), diet (t = 0.53, p = 0.603), exercise (t = -0.27, p = 0.795), stress modification (t = 2.17, p = 0.047). T- test analysis could not be performed on medication and smoking subscales because the standard error of the difference was zero. Although the PQOL pretest and post-test mean difference in this sample was not significant, the sample had a high perception of their quality of life. Quality of life may be unrelated to cardiac rehabilitation participation or there may be temporal changes that may require study over time to detect changes. One unexpected and unusual finding in this pilot study was the significant difference between pretest and post-test scores for trait anxiety. Trait anxiety mean score for the sample decreased in the post-test. This is unusual in that trait anxiety refers to relatively stable individual differences in anxiety proneness and usually does not change. The mean scores for trait anxiety were only slightly higher than the norms for adults ages 50-69 suggesting that the sample as a whole is not prone to anxiety in general. There was a significant difference in stress modification behavior in the direction of decreased ability to modify responses to stressful situations. This again may indicate the need to examine these behaviors over longer periods of time to detect true effects of educational interventions commonly associated with cardiac rehabilitation. A larger sample size would possibly yield more statistically significant results.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect Of Cardiac Rehabilitation On Quality Of Life, Anxiety, And Self-care In Coronary Artery Disease Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Wilkinson, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA, (updated February 2015) email: susan.wilkinson@angelo.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165963-
dc.description.abstractMajor lifestyle changes are required after a person experiences an acute coronary event. Rehabilitation programs for coronary artery disease patients are designed to assist the patient with these lifestyle changes by altering the survivor's self-care patterns and improve long-term physical and psychological outcomes. By coordinating education, counseling, and exercise programs, the nurse can help individuals move toward a maximal physiological, psychological, social and vocational recovery. This pilot study was designed to test the research plan of a study to explore the effect of cardiac rehabilitation program participation on anxiety, quality of life, and self-care among coronary artery disease patients. Fifteen patients (8 men and 7 women) with coronary artery disease aged 45-81 (mean age 64.06, SD±9. 11) were included in the pilot study sample. A pretest post-test design was used. Data was collected before initial participation in the cardiac rehabilitation program and again at the completion of the 12 week program. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory was used to measure anxiety. Quality of life was measured with the Perceived Quality of Life Scale (PQOL). The Health Behavior Scale was used to measure performance of suggested self-care behaviors (modify diet, administer medications, manage stress, exercise, and reduce smoking). Initial pretest post-test findings included perceived quality of life (t = 0.54, p=0.599), state anxiety (t = 0.13, p = 0. 896),trait anxiety (t = 2.39, p = 0.032), diet (t = 0.53, p = 0.603), exercise (t = -0.27, p = 0.795), stress modification (t = 2.17, p = 0.047). T- test analysis could not be performed on medication and smoking subscales because the standard error of the difference was zero. Although the PQOL pretest and post-test mean difference in this sample was not significant, the sample had a high perception of their quality of life. Quality of life may be unrelated to cardiac rehabilitation participation or there may be temporal changes that may require study over time to detect changes. One unexpected and unusual finding in this pilot study was the significant difference between pretest and post-test scores for trait anxiety. Trait anxiety mean score for the sample decreased in the post-test. This is unusual in that trait anxiety refers to relatively stable individual differences in anxiety proneness and usually does not change. The mean scores for trait anxiety were only slightly higher than the norms for adults ages 50-69 suggesting that the sample as a whole is not prone to anxiety in general. There was a significant difference in stress modification behavior in the direction of decreased ability to modify responses to stressful situations. This again may indicate the need to examine these behaviors over longer periods of time to detect true effects of educational interventions commonly associated with cardiac rehabilitation. A larger sample size would possibly yield more statistically significant results.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:24Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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