2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165964
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Self-transcendence In Caregivers Of Adults With Dementia
Author(s):
Acton, Gayle
Author Details:
Gayle Acton, PhD, Assistant Professor, The University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: gayle.acton@mail.utexas.edu
Abstract:
PROBLEM/PURPOSE Caring for adults with dementia is extremely stressful and burdensome. Interventions have been tested for their effects on the negative consequences of caregiving. However, these interventions have produced only small effects on caregiving outcomes. Given the chronic nature of caregiving stress, perhaps researchers have been measuring intervention outcomes that are inappropriate. The purpose of this study is to investigate selftranscendence in caregivers of adults with dementia. Self-transcendence is defined as the cap capacity to reach out beyond the self to achieve a broadened perspective to help discover or make meaning of an experience. In addition, researchers have found empiric evidence linking self-transcendence to well-being. Perhaps it is unrealistic to expect interventions to relieve the chronic stress of caregiving. However, it may not be unrealistic to expect that caregivers can transcend or "get beyond" caregiving burden, and find meaning within the caregiving experience. SAMPLE The sample for this study consisted of 12 family caregivers of adults with dementia. Subjects were selected by purposive, non-probability sampling technique. RESEARCH QUESTIONS 1.How do caregivers describe self-transcendence views and behaviors in the context of their care of a family member with dementia? 2.What are the patterns of self-transcendence in caregivers of adults with dementia? METHODS This study was a descriptive naturalistic field study. Data were collected by guided interviews. interviews were audiotaped and will be analyzed using content analysis. FINDINGS All data have been collected and are being analyzed. IMPLICATIONS Although many intervention strategies for caregivers have been tested on various outcomes such burden and stress, few strategies have produced statistically significant improvements in these outcomes. Yet, caregivers consistently profess their satisfaction with these and other intervention strategies. Is it possible that researchers are measuring outcomes insensitive to change post intervention? Can researchers really expect to lessen the burden on a caregiver providing constant and demanding care to a loved one? Perhaps the intervention strategies are helping caregivers find meaning and purpose within the caregiving experience; thus transcending the stress and burden of caregiving. Findings from this study may help illuminate the importance of this concept in both intervention and outcome.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSelf-transcendence In Caregivers Of Adults With Dementiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorActon, Gayleen_US
dc.author.detailsGayle Acton, PhD, Assistant Professor, The University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: gayle.acton@mail.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165964-
dc.description.abstractPROBLEM/PURPOSE Caring for adults with dementia is extremely stressful and burdensome. Interventions have been tested for their effects on the negative consequences of caregiving. However, these interventions have produced only small effects on caregiving outcomes. Given the chronic nature of caregiving stress, perhaps researchers have been measuring intervention outcomes that are inappropriate. The purpose of this study is to investigate selftranscendence in caregivers of adults with dementia. Self-transcendence is defined as the cap capacity to reach out beyond the self to achieve a broadened perspective to help discover or make meaning of an experience. In addition, researchers have found empiric evidence linking self-transcendence to well-being. Perhaps it is unrealistic to expect interventions to relieve the chronic stress of caregiving. However, it may not be unrealistic to expect that caregivers can transcend or "get beyond" caregiving burden, and find meaning within the caregiving experience. SAMPLE The sample for this study consisted of 12 family caregivers of adults with dementia. Subjects were selected by purposive, non-probability sampling technique. RESEARCH QUESTIONS 1.How do caregivers describe self-transcendence views and behaviors in the context of their care of a family member with dementia? 2.What are the patterns of self-transcendence in caregivers of adults with dementia? METHODS This study was a descriptive naturalistic field study. Data were collected by guided interviews. interviews were audiotaped and will be analyzed using content analysis. FINDINGS All data have been collected and are being analyzed. IMPLICATIONS Although many intervention strategies for caregivers have been tested on various outcomes such burden and stress, few strategies have produced statistically significant improvements in these outcomes. Yet, caregivers consistently profess their satisfaction with these and other intervention strategies. Is it possible that researchers are measuring outcomes insensitive to change post intervention? Can researchers really expect to lessen the burden on a caregiver providing constant and demanding care to a loved one? Perhaps the intervention strategies are helping caregivers find meaning and purpose within the caregiving experience; thus transcending the stress and burden of caregiving. Findings from this study may help illuminate the importance of this concept in both intervention and outcome.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:25Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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