Influence of depression, alcohol abuse, and health perception on quality of life in urban black older adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165967
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Influence of depression, alcohol abuse, and health perception on quality of life in urban black older adults
Author(s):
Martin, Judy
Author Details:
Judy Martin, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee, USA, email: jmartin@utmem.edu
Abstract:
Background/Purpose: Although a higher rate of physical health problems with earlier onset has been documented in older black adults, research focused on quality of life for the older black adult has been limited. With ever increasing numbers of black older adults, influences on quality of life in this population demand the attention of health care providers and researchers. This descriptive correlational study explored the relationship of the independent variables of depression, alcohol abuse, and health perception to quality of life in the older adult black urban population. Methods: This correlational study involved assessment, via retrospective chart review, of a non-probability sample (N=49) of community-living black patients of a mid-southern primary care clinic designed for senior citizens. Participants were black adults aged 58 years and older (M=67.5 years, SD=6.2) who received care at the clinic. Data were previously collected as a part of the baseline health status assessment of participants of the seniors clinic. Quality of life was measured with a 100 mm visual analog scale. Depression was measured with the Geriatric Depression Scale (short form); alcohol abuse with the CHARMM; and health perception with the Current Health Scale. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Spearman's correlational analyses. Finally, multiple linear regression analyses quantified the direct and indirect variance of quality of life explained by depression, alcohol abuse, and health perception. Results: The study sample reported high levels of quality of life, depression, and perceived health, but a low level of alcohol abuse. Only depression was associated with the level of quality of life (r=.52); moreover, depression explained 20% of quality of life variance. There was also a mild inverse association (r=-.30) between the alcohol abuse and health perception. Implications: Implications are discussed regarding the association between alcohol abuse and perceived health, the high prevalence of depression, and the demonstrated influence of depression on quality of life. Findings indicate the vital need for health care providers to assess for depression in community-living black older in designing interventions directed toward improving their quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfluence of depression, alcohol abuse, and health perception on quality of life in urban black older adultsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Judyen_US
dc.author.detailsJudy Martin, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee, USA, email: jmartin@utmem.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165967-
dc.description.abstractBackground/Purpose: Although a higher rate of physical health problems with earlier onset has been documented in older black adults, research focused on quality of life for the older black adult has been limited. With ever increasing numbers of black older adults, influences on quality of life in this population demand the attention of health care providers and researchers. This descriptive correlational study explored the relationship of the independent variables of depression, alcohol abuse, and health perception to quality of life in the older adult black urban population. Methods: This correlational study involved assessment, via retrospective chart review, of a non-probability sample (N=49) of community-living black patients of a mid-southern primary care clinic designed for senior citizens. Participants were black adults aged 58 years and older (M=67.5 years, SD=6.2) who received care at the clinic. Data were previously collected as a part of the baseline health status assessment of participants of the seniors clinic. Quality of life was measured with a 100 mm visual analog scale. Depression was measured with the Geriatric Depression Scale (short form); alcohol abuse with the CHARMM; and health perception with the Current Health Scale. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Spearman's correlational analyses. Finally, multiple linear regression analyses quantified the direct and indirect variance of quality of life explained by depression, alcohol abuse, and health perception. Results: The study sample reported high levels of quality of life, depression, and perceived health, but a low level of alcohol abuse. Only depression was associated with the level of quality of life (r=.52); moreover, depression explained 20% of quality of life variance. There was also a mild inverse association (r=-.30) between the alcohol abuse and health perception. Implications: Implications are discussed regarding the association between alcohol abuse and perceived health, the high prevalence of depression, and the demonstrated influence of depression on quality of life. Findings indicate the vital need for health care providers to assess for depression in community-living black older in designing interventions directed toward improving their quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:29Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.