2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165968
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preterm infant positioning pilot study
Author(s):
Oliver, Sandra
Author Details:
Sandra Oliver, PhD, Nursing Research Associate, Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Temple, Texas, USA, email: skoliver@swmail.sw.org
Abstract:
At birth babies have a similar head shape whether they are born prematurely or at term. Preterm infants, who require an extended hospital stay, tend to develop a definite bilaterally flattened head shape, and the appearance of an elongated face. The cranial molding of bilateral head flattening presents lasting physical and psychosocial difficulties for the premature infant. Prevention of bilateral head flattening is a significant nursing problem. The authors' study of waterbed therapy suggests that the type of mattress on which the neonate is placed may have little impact on cranial molding. The findings suggest that a regular routine of repositioning the neonate may be more important than mattress therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of positioning on cranial molding in preterm infants who are hospitalized in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). The sample for the study was drawn from the population of infants who required neonatal intensive care There were four participating institutions. The effect of a regular turning schedule on the cranial molding of preterm infants was evaluated using a quasi-experimental design. Each hospital entered a minimum of 12 infants. The first half of the number of enrollees utilized the institutions' standard turning protocol. The second group of infants was placed on the study turning protocol. Infants' height, weight, and cranial measurements were taken on the third day of life and every week until discharge from the NICU. Study design and protocols were pretested to assure safety of the protocol and efficiency in data collection. The null hypothesis stated that there will be no significant difference in bilateral head flattening in infants maintained on a standard protocol or turning regimen. The primary outcome variable was the ratio of the anterior-posterior diameter to the biparietal diameter (ap/bp ratio). Any ratio greater than 1.40 was considered an indication of bilateral head flattening. This variable was measured weekly from admission to the study for two weeks or until discharge from the NICU. Seventy babies were enrolled in the study. Thirty-four in the control group and thirty-six in the experimental group. There were no important baseline differences between the groups. At the end of the first week there were no significant differences in anterior posterior diameter between the groups (control: 1.34/ experimental: 1.30). By the ninth week through the end of the study at the thirteenth week, there were statistically significant differences (p=.05) between the two groups. The control group ap/bp ratios reflected bilateral head flattening (mean 1.42 range 1.31-1.55). The experimental group ap/bp ratios reflected round head shape (mean 1.30 range 1.24-1.35). The specific turning protocol was not correlated to the outcome variables. The frequency of turning and the avoidance placing infants in a previously used position within eight hours were positively correlated to head shape. In conclusion, infants who were turned every two hours and never placed in the same position twice in eight hours had rounder head shapes. The infants that were turned according to NICU standard turning protocol demonstrated bilateral head flattening. The turning protocol has a significant effect (p=.02) on head shape of premature infants.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreterm infant positioning pilot studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOliver, Sandraen_US
dc.author.detailsSandra Oliver, PhD, Nursing Research Associate, Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Temple, Texas, USA, email: skoliver@swmail.sw.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165968-
dc.description.abstractAt birth babies have a similar head shape whether they are born prematurely or at term. Preterm infants, who require an extended hospital stay, tend to develop a definite bilaterally flattened head shape, and the appearance of an elongated face. The cranial molding of bilateral head flattening presents lasting physical and psychosocial difficulties for the premature infant. Prevention of bilateral head flattening is a significant nursing problem. The authors' study of waterbed therapy suggests that the type of mattress on which the neonate is placed may have little impact on cranial molding. The findings suggest that a regular routine of repositioning the neonate may be more important than mattress therapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of positioning on cranial molding in preterm infants who are hospitalized in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). The sample for the study was drawn from the population of infants who required neonatal intensive care There were four participating institutions. The effect of a regular turning schedule on the cranial molding of preterm infants was evaluated using a quasi-experimental design. Each hospital entered a minimum of 12 infants. The first half of the number of enrollees utilized the institutions' standard turning protocol. The second group of infants was placed on the study turning protocol. Infants' height, weight, and cranial measurements were taken on the third day of life and every week until discharge from the NICU. Study design and protocols were pretested to assure safety of the protocol and efficiency in data collection. The null hypothesis stated that there will be no significant difference in bilateral head flattening in infants maintained on a standard protocol or turning regimen. The primary outcome variable was the ratio of the anterior-posterior diameter to the biparietal diameter (ap/bp ratio). Any ratio greater than 1.40 was considered an indication of bilateral head flattening. This variable was measured weekly from admission to the study for two weeks or until discharge from the NICU. Seventy babies were enrolled in the study. Thirty-four in the control group and thirty-six in the experimental group. There were no important baseline differences between the groups. At the end of the first week there were no significant differences in anterior posterior diameter between the groups (control: 1.34/ experimental: 1.30). By the ninth week through the end of the study at the thirteenth week, there were statistically significant differences (p=.05) between the two groups. The control group ap/bp ratios reflected bilateral head flattening (mean 1.42 range 1.31-1.55). The experimental group ap/bp ratios reflected round head shape (mean 1.30 range 1.24-1.35). The specific turning protocol was not correlated to the outcome variables. The frequency of turning and the avoidance placing infants in a previously used position within eight hours were positively correlated to head shape. In conclusion, infants who were turned every two hours and never placed in the same position twice in eight hours had rounder head shapes. The infants that were turned according to NICU standard turning protocol demonstrated bilateral head flattening. The turning protocol has a significant effect (p=.02) on head shape of premature infants.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:31Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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