Interactive behavior patterns of incarcerated mothers and their infants: A comparison with two groups of non-incarcerated mothers and their infants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165969
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Interactive behavior patterns of incarcerated mothers and their infants: A comparison with two groups of non-incarcerated mothers and their infants
Author(s):
Tesh, Esther
Author Details:
Esther Tesh, PhD, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: etesh@hsc.vcu.edu
Abstract:
Women who are incarcerated during pregnancy and give birth while imprisoned have extended time with their infant for only a day or so after birth. Subsequent contact, limited to weekly prison visiting hours, often take place in a crowded, noisy setting with other inmates and visitors. Even though separation and environment for interaction make it difficult for mother and infant to learn each other's responses and patterns of behavior, the vast majority of inmate mothers expect to regain custody and care for their infant when released from prison. Further, incarceration likely contributes to significantly higher depression levels in these mothers. The purpose of this study was to describe patterns of incarcerated mother-infant interactive behavior and compare their behavior with two groups of mothers and infants where the mother had never been imprisoned. Subjects included 20 incarcerated mothers and infants (prison group) whose interactive behavior was observed in the visiting area of a large state women's correctional facility, 20 non-incarcerated mothers and healthy infants (community group) whose behavior was observed in their home, and 20 mothers with medically fragile infants (medically fragile group), observed in their infant's hospital room. The community and medically fragile groups, matched with prison subjects for race, education and infant age at observation, were similar for maternal age, previous children, and infant gender, however significantly more community and medically fragile mothers were married. Mothers-infant interactive behavior was observed for approximately 30 minutes and amount of each behavior per 30 minutes was calculated. Behaviors and responses conceptually related to positive or negative affect were analyzed using common factor analysis and yielded 3 factor patterns related to play and positive behavior, infant negative behavior, and maternal holding. ANOVA was used to analyze scores for the factor patterns (sum of standardized scores for behaviors in each factor pattern), a maternal care pattern (sum of caregiving behavior scores), and amount of infant alertness. Only the play and positive behavior pattern showed significant group effects. Specific behaviors included in this pattern (mother gesture, positive, play, eye to eye, infant positive, play) were further analyzed for group differences. Both prison and medically fragile infants showed significantly less play than community infants while medically fragile mothers showed significantly less play and gesture than community mothers and significantly less gesture than prison mothers. Depression scores (CES-D), significantly higher for these prison mothers than for community mothers, were not significantly correlated with pattern scores for either group, indicating that prison mothers interacted with their infants in ways that were not reflective of their higher level of depressive feelings. Thus, the interactive behavior of prison mothers was similar in many ways to that of comparison mothers. However, difference in prison and medically fragile infant play and responsive behavior likely reflected effects of separation and the visiting environment. The significant differences for the play and positive behavior pattern indicates that it may be the most sensitive indicator of the quality of mother-infant interaction for these groups.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInteractive behavior patterns of incarcerated mothers and their infants: A comparison with two groups of non-incarcerated mothers and their infantsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTesh, Estheren_US
dc.author.detailsEsther Tesh, PhD, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Nursing, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: etesh@hsc.vcu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165969-
dc.description.abstractWomen who are incarcerated during pregnancy and give birth while imprisoned have extended time with their infant for only a day or so after birth. Subsequent contact, limited to weekly prison visiting hours, often take place in a crowded, noisy setting with other inmates and visitors. Even though separation and environment for interaction make it difficult for mother and infant to learn each other's responses and patterns of behavior, the vast majority of inmate mothers expect to regain custody and care for their infant when released from prison. Further, incarceration likely contributes to significantly higher depression levels in these mothers. The purpose of this study was to describe patterns of incarcerated mother-infant interactive behavior and compare their behavior with two groups of mothers and infants where the mother had never been imprisoned. Subjects included 20 incarcerated mothers and infants (prison group) whose interactive behavior was observed in the visiting area of a large state women's correctional facility, 20 non-incarcerated mothers and healthy infants (community group) whose behavior was observed in their home, and 20 mothers with medically fragile infants (medically fragile group), observed in their infant's hospital room. The community and medically fragile groups, matched with prison subjects for race, education and infant age at observation, were similar for maternal age, previous children, and infant gender, however significantly more community and medically fragile mothers were married. Mothers-infant interactive behavior was observed for approximately 30 minutes and amount of each behavior per 30 minutes was calculated. Behaviors and responses conceptually related to positive or negative affect were analyzed using common factor analysis and yielded 3 factor patterns related to play and positive behavior, infant negative behavior, and maternal holding. ANOVA was used to analyze scores for the factor patterns (sum of standardized scores for behaviors in each factor pattern), a maternal care pattern (sum of caregiving behavior scores), and amount of infant alertness. Only the play and positive behavior pattern showed significant group effects. Specific behaviors included in this pattern (mother gesture, positive, play, eye to eye, infant positive, play) were further analyzed for group differences. Both prison and medically fragile infants showed significantly less play than community infants while medically fragile mothers showed significantly less play and gesture than community mothers and significantly less gesture than prison mothers. Depression scores (CES-D), significantly higher for these prison mothers than for community mothers, were not significantly correlated with pattern scores for either group, indicating that prison mothers interacted with their infants in ways that were not reflective of their higher level of depressive feelings. Thus, the interactive behavior of prison mothers was similar in many ways to that of comparison mothers. However, difference in prison and medically fragile infant play and responsive behavior likely reflected effects of separation and the visiting environment. The significant differences for the play and positive behavior pattern indicates that it may be the most sensitive indicator of the quality of mother-infant interaction for these groups.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:32Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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