2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165970
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of control in individuals undergoing coronary bypass surgery
Author(s):
Cain, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Cain, Bellarmine College Lansing School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: lcain@bellarmine.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to test the idea that adaptiveness of control perceptions derives from individuals being able to achieve an acceptable level of control in relation to what is preferred in a given situation. The hypothesis for this study was that preference, level, and acceptability of control vary by target of the control effort, e.g. control of symptoms, treatment, or disease course. In addition, two research questions were examined: (a) what amount of variance in adjustment and quality of life is explained by control perceptions; and (b) what factors do individuals identify as influencing control perceptions. A cross-sectional design with a non-probability sample of 87 individuals who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery during the previous 10-17 months was used. Measurement included: perceptions of preference, level, and acceptability of control (three 10-point Cantril ladders for each target); adjustment (selected subscales of the SF-36); mood (Profile of Mood States); quality of life (three Cantril ladders); and clinical and sociodemographic characteristics (self-report). Using repeated measures analysis of variance to test the hypothesis, it was found that perceived level of control of treatment and disease course were significantly greater than perceived control of symptoms. Acceptability of perceived control of treatment was significantly higher than acceptability of perceived control of symptoms. The first research question was examined using hierarchical multiple regression. Both acceptability and level of control captured the same variance in the emotional measures and general health depending on which was entered first. However, in the analyses with the functional measures and quality of life, level and acceptability of control were both significant, indicating that each contributed unique explanatory information. Regarding the second research question, content analysis of participant interviews revealed several predominate factors that influence control perceptions: level of participation in decision-making, quality of provider-patient relationships, capacity to participate in treatment regimens, and personal faith. This study highlights the importance of interventions that assist individuals to maintain acceptable perceptions of control in order to minimize the emotional impact of stressful events and promote general well being and quality of life during recovery.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of control in individuals undergoing coronary bypass surgeryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCain, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Cain, Bellarmine College Lansing School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Louisville, Kentucky, USA, email: lcain@bellarmine.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165970-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to test the idea that adaptiveness of control perceptions derives from individuals being able to achieve an acceptable level of control in relation to what is preferred in a given situation. The hypothesis for this study was that preference, level, and acceptability of control vary by target of the control effort, e.g. control of symptoms, treatment, or disease course. In addition, two research questions were examined: (a) what amount of variance in adjustment and quality of life is explained by control perceptions; and (b) what factors do individuals identify as influencing control perceptions. A cross-sectional design with a non-probability sample of 87 individuals who had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery during the previous 10-17 months was used. Measurement included: perceptions of preference, level, and acceptability of control (three 10-point Cantril ladders for each target); adjustment (selected subscales of the SF-36); mood (Profile of Mood States); quality of life (three Cantril ladders); and clinical and sociodemographic characteristics (self-report). Using repeated measures analysis of variance to test the hypothesis, it was found that perceived level of control of treatment and disease course were significantly greater than perceived control of symptoms. Acceptability of perceived control of treatment was significantly higher than acceptability of perceived control of symptoms. The first research question was examined using hierarchical multiple regression. Both acceptability and level of control captured the same variance in the emotional measures and general health depending on which was entered first. However, in the analyses with the functional measures and quality of life, level and acceptability of control were both significant, indicating that each contributed unique explanatory information. Regarding the second research question, content analysis of participant interviews revealed several predominate factors that influence control perceptions: level of participation in decision-making, quality of provider-patient relationships, capacity to participate in treatment regimens, and personal faith. This study highlights the importance of interventions that assist individuals to maintain acceptable perceptions of control in order to minimize the emotional impact of stressful events and promote general well being and quality of life during recovery.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:33Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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