Measuring school nurses’ sense of efficacy to deal with violence in their schools

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165971
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring school nurses’ sense of efficacy to deal with violence in their schools
Author(s):
Best, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Best, Assistant Professor, University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing, Galveston, Texas, USA, email: mbest@utmb.edu
Abstract:
Background: The occurrence of violence incidents in schools is becoming more frequent. Although nurses are trained in first aid and CPR, their role has now expanded in many schools to be first responders in an emergency situation as part of a crisis management team. The nurse's role in violence prevention and management is a fairly recent phenomenon and one that may create some challenge for school nurses to merge into their other roles. Purpose: Bandura's (1986, 1997) theory of self-efficacy provided a framework for development of an instrument to measure school nurses' perceived efficacy in managing violence in their schools. Self-efficacy refers to expectations about personal capabilities. Efficacy beliefs are important to study and measure because they are said to have causal influence on behavior (Bandura, 1997). Sample: Two convenience samples totaling 570 school nurses completed a questionnaire about school violence while attending a Southwestern school nurse conference during 1999 or 2000. The nurses worked predominantly in schools in urban and suburban areas with children whose families were low and middle income. The average study participant worked 40 hours per week and was responsible for 1,108 students. Methodology: An initial item pool of 13 items was developed from emerging literature on predictors of violent episodes in schools, and from recent thinking about school crisis management. Items were constructed to represent three general themes: Having a Plan, Emergency Medical Care, and Signs and Symptoms, and then assessed by four content experts. Data from 1999 were subjected to a confirmatory factor analysis, which was replicated with the 2000 data set. Results: The 1999 data (N = 325) strongly supported the 3-factor model, with all 13 original items contributing to the structure. Goodness of fit indices ranged from .94 to .96, and a residual mean square error of .03. Reliability estimates for the three theorized factors ranged from .79 to .86. When the same factor model was imposed on the 2000 data (N = 242), the results showed an invariant factor structure. Goodness of fit ranged from .91 to .94, with RMS error of .05. Reliability estimates for the three factors were .67 to .87. Conclusions: The Self-Efficacy for Violence in School (SEVS) measure shows strong psychometric properties, with a dependable subscale structure and acceptable reliability estimates. SEVS can be used with some confidence for various purposes such as school (or district) needs assessments for school nurses, designing training programs to enhance school nurse skill and self-efficacy, and program evaluation. We also describe further validity efforts for SEVS.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring school nurses’ sense of efficacy to deal with violence in their schoolsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBest, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Best, Assistant Professor, University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing, Galveston, Texas, USA, email: mbest@utmb.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165971-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The occurrence of violence incidents in schools is becoming more frequent. Although nurses are trained in first aid and CPR, their role has now expanded in many schools to be first responders in an emergency situation as part of a crisis management team. The nurse's role in violence prevention and management is a fairly recent phenomenon and one that may create some challenge for school nurses to merge into their other roles. Purpose: Bandura's (1986, 1997) theory of self-efficacy provided a framework for development of an instrument to measure school nurses' perceived efficacy in managing violence in their schools. Self-efficacy refers to expectations about personal capabilities. Efficacy beliefs are important to study and measure because they are said to have causal influence on behavior (Bandura, 1997). Sample: Two convenience samples totaling 570 school nurses completed a questionnaire about school violence while attending a Southwestern school nurse conference during 1999 or 2000. The nurses worked predominantly in schools in urban and suburban areas with children whose families were low and middle income. The average study participant worked 40 hours per week and was responsible for 1,108 students. Methodology: An initial item pool of 13 items was developed from emerging literature on predictors of violent episodes in schools, and from recent thinking about school crisis management. Items were constructed to represent three general themes: Having a Plan, Emergency Medical Care, and Signs and Symptoms, and then assessed by four content experts. Data from 1999 were subjected to a confirmatory factor analysis, which was replicated with the 2000 data set. Results: The 1999 data (N = 325) strongly supported the 3-factor model, with all 13 original items contributing to the structure. Goodness of fit indices ranged from .94 to .96, and a residual mean square error of .03. Reliability estimates for the three theorized factors ranged from .79 to .86. When the same factor model was imposed on the 2000 data (N = 242), the results showed an invariant factor structure. Goodness of fit ranged from .91 to .94, with RMS error of .05. Reliability estimates for the three factors were .67 to .87. Conclusions: The Self-Efficacy for Violence in School (SEVS) measure shows strong psychometric properties, with a dependable subscale structure and acceptable reliability estimates. SEVS can be used with some confidence for various purposes such as school (or district) needs assessments for school nurses, designing training programs to enhance school nurse skill and self-efficacy, and program evaluation. We also describe further validity efforts for SEVS.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:34Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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