2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165972
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predictors of early coitus in adolescent girls
Author(s):
Felton, Gwen
Author Details:
Gwen Felton, PhD, Associate Professor, University of South Carolina Department of Family and Community Health Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: gwen.felton@sc.edu
Abstract:
Despite an 11% decrease in the prevalence of sexually experienced adolescents from 1991 to 1997, age at first coitus continues to decline. Although problem-solving skill has been included in intervention programs to deter early sex, little is known about its effects on age at first coitus in girls. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which problem-solving skill and other health related factors predict age at first coitus in adolescent girls. A volunteer sample (N=202) aged 16-19 was recruited from family planning clinics across South Carolina; 52% were black and 48% were white. Age at first coitus was classified as early (age =15) and delayed (age =16) with age at first coitus ranging from 11 to 19 years. The Revised Health Promotion Model was the organizing framework. Self-image, problem-solving, health promoting behavior, contraceptive history, mother's education, family structure, Medicaid status, and years of education were examined in black and white adolescent girls by age at first coitus (early versus delayed). Forty-four percent of the sample (n=88) reported early coitus. However, there were no race differentials in mean age at first coitus and proportion of black and white girls who initiated coitus early. The mean age for early coitus for blacks (14.04 years) and whites (14.20 years) were similar. Fifty-six percent of the sample (n=114) delayed coitus and both black and white groups were similar in mean age, 16.51 years and 16.38 years respectively. Black girls were more likely than white girls to live in single parent homes. Stratified analyses identified race as an effect modifier on the relationship between problem-solving and age at first coitus. Therefore, separate analyses were conducted for the two groups. Logistic regression models revealed three predictors of early age at first coitus in black girls but only one predictor in white girls. Black girls who had less problem- solving skill were 5 times more likely to have early coitus than their peers (OR=4.90, 95% CI=1.90-12.64). However, this was not the case for white girls (OR=1.11, 95% CI=0.46-2.64). Black girls who had coitus early were three times more likely to practice fewer health-promoting behaviors, and 7 times more likely to have less than 10 years of education. Early initiators of coitus were 2.4 times less likely to use contraceptives at first coitus than delayers. Neither self-image, family structure or mothers' education level predicted age at first coitus among blacks or whites. Blacks who initiate coitus early may lack sufficient problem-solving skills to regulate their cognitive, behavioral and emotional responses in sexual situations. Our findings demonstrate the importance of designing and testing effectiveness of such interventions particularly in sub-populations of girls. These findings shed light on the differences and similarities of black and white adolescent girls who initiate coitus early and those who delay.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredictors of early coitus in adolescent girlsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFelton, Gwenen_US
dc.author.detailsGwen Felton, PhD, Associate Professor, University of South Carolina Department of Family and Community Health Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: gwen.felton@sc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165972-
dc.description.abstractDespite an 11% decrease in the prevalence of sexually experienced adolescents from 1991 to 1997, age at first coitus continues to decline. Although problem-solving skill has been included in intervention programs to deter early sex, little is known about its effects on age at first coitus in girls. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which problem-solving skill and other health related factors predict age at first coitus in adolescent girls. A volunteer sample (N=202) aged 16-19 was recruited from family planning clinics across South Carolina; 52% were black and 48% were white. Age at first coitus was classified as early (age =15) and delayed (age =16) with age at first coitus ranging from 11 to 19 years. The Revised Health Promotion Model was the organizing framework. Self-image, problem-solving, health promoting behavior, contraceptive history, mother's education, family structure, Medicaid status, and years of education were examined in black and white adolescent girls by age at first coitus (early versus delayed). Forty-four percent of the sample (n=88) reported early coitus. However, there were no race differentials in mean age at first coitus and proportion of black and white girls who initiated coitus early. The mean age for early coitus for blacks (14.04 years) and whites (14.20 years) were similar. Fifty-six percent of the sample (n=114) delayed coitus and both black and white groups were similar in mean age, 16.51 years and 16.38 years respectively. Black girls were more likely than white girls to live in single parent homes. Stratified analyses identified race as an effect modifier on the relationship between problem-solving and age at first coitus. Therefore, separate analyses were conducted for the two groups. Logistic regression models revealed three predictors of early age at first coitus in black girls but only one predictor in white girls. Black girls who had less problem- solving skill were 5 times more likely to have early coitus than their peers (OR=4.90, 95% CI=1.90-12.64). However, this was not the case for white girls (OR=1.11, 95% CI=0.46-2.64). Black girls who had coitus early were three times more likely to practice fewer health-promoting behaviors, and 7 times more likely to have less than 10 years of education. Early initiators of coitus were 2.4 times less likely to use contraceptives at first coitus than delayers. Neither self-image, family structure or mothers' education level predicted age at first coitus among blacks or whites. Blacks who initiate coitus early may lack sufficient problem-solving skills to regulate their cognitive, behavioral and emotional responses in sexual situations. Our findings demonstrate the importance of designing and testing effectiveness of such interventions particularly in sub-populations of girls. These findings shed light on the differences and similarities of black and white adolescent girls who initiate coitus early and those who delay.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:35Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.