2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165973
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Supporting low income breastfeeding women: A community health intervention
Author(s):
Pugh, Linda
Author Details:
Linda Pugh, PhD, Director of Professional Education Programs, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: lpugh@son.jhmi.edu
Abstract:
Breastfeeding improves the health of mothers and babies. Women who breastfeed have less osteoporosis, and cancer. Breastfed infants have less SIDS, ear infections, diarrhea, and respiratory allergies. Healthy People 2000 set a goal "75% of all women begin breastfeeding right after delivery and 50% continue for six months." Numbers of breastfeeding mothers, particularly low-income remain low, as only 50.4% of women on WIC initiate breastfeeding and only 16.5% continue for six months. The primary aim of this randomized clinical trial is to evaluate an intervention to increase the duration of breastfeeding in low-income, predominately-minority women during the first six months of their infants' lives. The intervention was carried out by a community health nurse and a peer counselor. The costs of the intervention and the costs of medical care for the child were also tracked. Design and Procedures: During postpartum hospitalization, 41 low-income women (on medical assistance) were recruited and randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. Interviews were conducted in the client's hospital room, or home. Data about breastfeeding, infant outcomes, and fatigue were collected in person at recruitment, month three, and month six and by telephone at weeks one, two, three, four, six, and month four. Sample: Forty-one minority women (100% on Medical Assistance, mean age 21.6 years, 92% Black,) were randomly assigned to intervention or usual care groups. Intervention: Subjects in both groups received usual care (one hospital visit by a Lactation Consultant if subject delivered Monday through Friday). The intervention group also received visits from the community health nurse/peer counselor team, including daily visits during hospitalization, and at home during week one, two, at week four, and at the teams discretion as needed. Peer counselors provided telephone support twice weekly through week eight and weekly through month six. Findings: At six months, 45% are still breastfeeding in the intervention group (66.7% of those exclusively) and 35% in the usual care group (42.9% of those exclusively). Discussion: Findings suggest that this is a promising intervention that provides a high quality cost-effective way to improve the health of babies and women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSupporting low income breastfeeding women: A community health interventionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPugh, Lindaen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Pugh, PhD, Director of Professional Education Programs, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: lpugh@son.jhmi.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165973-
dc.description.abstractBreastfeeding improves the health of mothers and babies. Women who breastfeed have less osteoporosis, and cancer. Breastfed infants have less SIDS, ear infections, diarrhea, and respiratory allergies. Healthy People 2000 set a goal "75% of all women begin breastfeeding right after delivery and 50% continue for six months." Numbers of breastfeeding mothers, particularly low-income remain low, as only 50.4% of women on WIC initiate breastfeeding and only 16.5% continue for six months. The primary aim of this randomized clinical trial is to evaluate an intervention to increase the duration of breastfeeding in low-income, predominately-minority women during the first six months of their infants' lives. The intervention was carried out by a community health nurse and a peer counselor. The costs of the intervention and the costs of medical care for the child were also tracked. Design and Procedures: During postpartum hospitalization, 41 low-income women (on medical assistance) were recruited and randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. Interviews were conducted in the client's hospital room, or home. Data about breastfeeding, infant outcomes, and fatigue were collected in person at recruitment, month three, and month six and by telephone at weeks one, two, three, four, six, and month four. Sample: Forty-one minority women (100% on Medical Assistance, mean age 21.6 years, 92% Black,) were randomly assigned to intervention or usual care groups. Intervention: Subjects in both groups received usual care (one hospital visit by a Lactation Consultant if subject delivered Monday through Friday). The intervention group also received visits from the community health nurse/peer counselor team, including daily visits during hospitalization, and at home during week one, two, at week four, and at the teams discretion as needed. Peer counselors provided telephone support twice weekly through week eight and weekly through month six. Findings: At six months, 45% are still breastfeeding in the intervention group (66.7% of those exclusively) and 35% in the usual care group (42.9% of those exclusively). Discussion: Findings suggest that this is a promising intervention that provides a high quality cost-effective way to improve the health of babies and women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:37Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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