Quality of Life Concerns for Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes: Perspectives of Youth and Parents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165974
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality of Life Concerns for Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes: Perspectives of Youth and Parents
Author(s):
Faulkner, Melissa
Author Details:
Melissa Faulkner, University of Illinois at Chicago Department of Maternal-Child Nursing, College of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: melissaf@uic.edu
Abstract:
Research efforts focusing on the prevention of long-term complications of type 1 diabetes, such as neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy, have lead to the implementation of intensive insulin treatment protocols for patients. The ultimate goal is to attain euglycemic states. Adolescents with type 1 diabetes experience both physiological and psychological turmoil in their attempts to balance therapeutic regimens within the context of personal family structure and guidance. Conflicting reports exist regarding the association of metabolic control of glucose levels with quality of life (QOL) measures. More information is needed about the effects of intensive insulin treatment on not only physiological improvements in health status, but also on the psychosocial aspects of one's life that are germane to the period of adolescence. This investigation identified differences in QOL measures between adolescents with type 1 diabetes and healthy controls based upon data collected from both teens and parents. The sample consisted of 69 teens with diabetes (mean age 15.6 + 1.6 yrs.), 75 healthy controls (mean age 15.0 + 1.6 yrs.), and their individual parents. Those with diabetes and the controls had 54% and 35% males, respectively. There were 57 Caucasian (C) and 12 African-American (AA) subjects with diabetes; 61 C and 14 AA were controls. There were no significant differences in Tanner's stage of sexual maturity or body mass index between the two groups. The average age of diabetes onset was 8.9 + 3.8 years; the mean duration of diabetes was 6.7 + 3.8 years. The average hemoglobin A1c (Hb A1c ) value for the past year was 8.9 + 1.9 %, reflecting adequate glucose control for adolescents. Comparisons of QOL for youth with and without diabetes were completed using the following instruments: the Functional Status II, the Child Behavior Checklist, the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents, and the global measure of health and life satisfaction from the Diabetes Quality of Life Instrument (DQOL). Parents' perceptions of their children's competencies regarding typical age-related activities, social behavior, and school performance were not significantly different. However, a composite score of these measures indicated a significantly lower level of competencies as perceived by parents of youths with diabetes versus controls (P = .03). Both parents and teens with diabetes reported lower health status for the youths than controls and their parents (P < .05). Teens with diabetes experienced decreased life satisfaction as compared to controls (t = - 2.4, df = 114.5, P = .02). Metabolic control was significantly correlated with health perception (r = -.36, P = .004), but not impact, worries, or life satisfaction. However, for older adolescents (aged 17 to 19 yrs.), worries about diabetes were significantly correlated with metabolic control (r = .66, P = .008). Findings suggest that life satisfaction, worries associated with having diabetes, and general health status are important to consider when counseling teens and their parents about therapeutic management of glucose levels. Further study is needed to explore age variations of physiological and psychosocial QOL during adolescence.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality of Life Concerns for Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes: Perspectives of Youth and Parentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFaulkner, Melissaen_US
dc.author.detailsMelissa Faulkner, University of Illinois at Chicago Department of Maternal-Child Nursing, College of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois, USA, email: melissaf@uic.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165974-
dc.description.abstractResearch efforts focusing on the prevention of long-term complications of type 1 diabetes, such as neuropathy, nephropathy, and retinopathy, have lead to the implementation of intensive insulin treatment protocols for patients. The ultimate goal is to attain euglycemic states. Adolescents with type 1 diabetes experience both physiological and psychological turmoil in their attempts to balance therapeutic regimens within the context of personal family structure and guidance. Conflicting reports exist regarding the association of metabolic control of glucose levels with quality of life (QOL) measures. More information is needed about the effects of intensive insulin treatment on not only physiological improvements in health status, but also on the psychosocial aspects of one's life that are germane to the period of adolescence. This investigation identified differences in QOL measures between adolescents with type 1 diabetes and healthy controls based upon data collected from both teens and parents. The sample consisted of 69 teens with diabetes (mean age 15.6 + 1.6 yrs.), 75 healthy controls (mean age 15.0 + 1.6 yrs.), and their individual parents. Those with diabetes and the controls had 54% and 35% males, respectively. There were 57 Caucasian (C) and 12 African-American (AA) subjects with diabetes; 61 C and 14 AA were controls. There were no significant differences in Tanner's stage of sexual maturity or body mass index between the two groups. The average age of diabetes onset was 8.9 + 3.8 years; the mean duration of diabetes was 6.7 + 3.8 years. The average hemoglobin A1c (Hb A1c ) value for the past year was 8.9 + 1.9 %, reflecting adequate glucose control for adolescents. Comparisons of QOL for youth with and without diabetes were completed using the following instruments: the Functional Status II, the Child Behavior Checklist, the Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents, and the global measure of health and life satisfaction from the Diabetes Quality of Life Instrument (DQOL). Parents' perceptions of their children's competencies regarding typical age-related activities, social behavior, and school performance were not significantly different. However, a composite score of these measures indicated a significantly lower level of competencies as perceived by parents of youths with diabetes versus controls (P = .03). Both parents and teens with diabetes reported lower health status for the youths than controls and their parents (P < .05). Teens with diabetes experienced decreased life satisfaction as compared to controls (t = - 2.4, df = 114.5, P = .02). Metabolic control was significantly correlated with health perception (r = -.36, P = .004), but not impact, worries, or life satisfaction. However, for older adolescents (aged 17 to 19 yrs.), worries about diabetes were significantly correlated with metabolic control (r = .66, P = .008). Findings suggest that life satisfaction, worries associated with having diabetes, and general health status are important to consider when counseling teens and their parents about therapeutic management of glucose levels. Further study is needed to explore age variations of physiological and psychosocial QOL during adolescence.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:38Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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