Caregivers’ experiences of seeking community-based health care for elderly family members in declining health

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165975
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caregivers’ experiences of seeking community-based health care for elderly family members in declining health
Author(s):
Avery, Glenda
Author Details:
Glenda Avery, Auburn University School of Nursing, Auburn, Alabama, USA, email: averygp@auburn.edu
Abstract:
Past studies of elder health care using community-based long-term care (CBLTC) revealed that programs were fragmented, lacking in coverage, costly, and served only a small group. Institutional care for frail elders has been the norm while public sentiment is toward community-based care. New models of health care need to be implemented with an emphasis on earlier interventions before resources are depleted and caregivers exhausted. Past CBLTC, although costly, enhanced the ability of caregivers to continue care in the home for longer periods of times with better elder emotional well-being. The purpose of this study was to describe caregivers' experiences of seeking health care for elder family members in declining health. The themes that emerged about what was really needed versus what was supplied can help develop future health care management models, especially in advanced nursing practice. A focused ethnography emergent design guided the collection and analysis of data. Historical review established the influence of past CBLTC and community-based nursing models on current elder health care. Two years of field work, by the researcher, and 22 interviews about 33 caregiving experiences identified themes related to seeking help and suggestions to improve future health care for others in similar situations. Constant comparative analysis revealed that health care was paradoxical, even chaotic at times; nursing care was virtually invisible; and caregiver ambivalence occurred when stress conflicted with self-advocacy needs. The caregivers provided most of the care at home but wanted more accessible quality care and consultative services from competent gerontologists about health care needs and community resources. Caregivers viewed consistent early help as essential and were concerned about the future inequities and cost of care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaregivers’ experiences of seeking community-based health care for elderly family members in declining healthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAvery, Glendaen_US
dc.author.detailsGlenda Avery, Auburn University School of Nursing, Auburn, Alabama, USA, email: averygp@auburn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165975-
dc.description.abstractPast studies of elder health care using community-based long-term care (CBLTC) revealed that programs were fragmented, lacking in coverage, costly, and served only a small group. Institutional care for frail elders has been the norm while public sentiment is toward community-based care. New models of health care need to be implemented with an emphasis on earlier interventions before resources are depleted and caregivers exhausted. Past CBLTC, although costly, enhanced the ability of caregivers to continue care in the home for longer periods of times with better elder emotional well-being. The purpose of this study was to describe caregivers' experiences of seeking health care for elder family members in declining health. The themes that emerged about what was really needed versus what was supplied can help develop future health care management models, especially in advanced nursing practice. A focused ethnography emergent design guided the collection and analysis of data. Historical review established the influence of past CBLTC and community-based nursing models on current elder health care. Two years of field work, by the researcher, and 22 interviews about 33 caregiving experiences identified themes related to seeking help and suggestions to improve future health care for others in similar situations. Constant comparative analysis revealed that health care was paradoxical, even chaotic at times; nursing care was virtually invisible; and caregiver ambivalence occurred when stress conflicted with self-advocacy needs. The caregivers provided most of the care at home but wanted more accessible quality care and consultative services from competent gerontologists about health care needs and community resources. Caregivers viewed consistent early help as essential and were concerned about the future inequities and cost of care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:39Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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