2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165976
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Asthma management in school-based health centers: Adherence to recommendations
Author(s):
Johantgen, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Johantgen, MS/MSc, Service Fellow, University of Maryland-Baltimore School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: johantgen@son.umaryland.edu
Abstract:
Background: Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood. It can be a significant burden not only in terms of health care costs but also lost productivity and reduced participation in family and school life. Specific guidelines have been developed by leading experts in the field. However, research suggests that these guidelines are not consistently followed. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the compliance with asthma treatment recommendations in school-based health centers (SBHCs). Methods: Data were extracted from SBHC medical records for students with asthma who had been treated for acute symptoms. The study was conducted in 5 Baltimore City elementary schools during the 1998-1999 school year. Evidence of precipitating factors, assessments, treatments, and symptom resolution were examined. Findings: The SBHCs administered 235 acute asthma treatments for 71 unique students. Precipitating factors included unavailability of medications, upper respiratory infections, and changing weather. Several students did not realize that their inhalers were empty when they came to the SBHC. For more than a third of the visits, students had been experiencing symptoms for between 12 and 24 hours. Peak flows were inconsistently reported. For the majority of visits (64 %), only one albuterol nebulizer treatment was required. For the 10 visits requiring 4 or more treatments, 2 students left school to be seen by their primary care provider and 1 student was sent to the emergency department. More than 85% of the students who received acute asthma treatment were able to return to class. Conclusions: Overall, asthma management recommendations were not consistently followed. In some instances, nurse practitioners were not aware of the guidelines and asthma flow sheets that would facilitate adherence were not utilized. Many of the factors found to contribute to acute asthma exacerbation are amenable to intervention by SBHC staff. Improved communication and coordination with primary care providers is essential.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAsthma management in school-based health centers: Adherence to recommendationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohantgen, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Johantgen, MS/MSc, Service Fellow, University of Maryland-Baltimore School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: johantgen@son.umaryland.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165976-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood. It can be a significant burden not only in terms of health care costs but also lost productivity and reduced participation in family and school life. Specific guidelines have been developed by leading experts in the field. However, research suggests that these guidelines are not consistently followed. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the compliance with asthma treatment recommendations in school-based health centers (SBHCs). Methods: Data were extracted from SBHC medical records for students with asthma who had been treated for acute symptoms. The study was conducted in 5 Baltimore City elementary schools during the 1998-1999 school year. Evidence of precipitating factors, assessments, treatments, and symptom resolution were examined. Findings: The SBHCs administered 235 acute asthma treatments for 71 unique students. Precipitating factors included unavailability of medications, upper respiratory infections, and changing weather. Several students did not realize that their inhalers were empty when they came to the SBHC. For more than a third of the visits, students had been experiencing symptoms for between 12 and 24 hours. Peak flows were inconsistently reported. For the majority of visits (64 %), only one albuterol nebulizer treatment was required. For the 10 visits requiring 4 or more treatments, 2 students left school to be seen by their primary care provider and 1 student was sent to the emergency department. More than 85% of the students who received acute asthma treatment were able to return to class. Conclusions: Overall, asthma management recommendations were not consistently followed. In some instances, nurse practitioners were not aware of the guidelines and asthma flow sheets that would facilitate adherence were not utilized. Many of the factors found to contribute to acute asthma exacerbation are amenable to intervention by SBHC staff. Improved communication and coordination with primary care providers is essential.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:40Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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