2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165979
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adding stress management to lifestyle intervention to treat stage one hypertension
Author(s):
Liehr, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Liehr, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Nursing, Houston, Texas, USA, email: Patricia.R.Liehr@uth.tmc.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the impact of adding stress management conducted by advanced practice nurses to structured exercise and nutrition counseling in the treatment of Stage one hypertension. All subjects (n=24) received the exercise and nutrition counseling intervention; 12 of these were randomly assigned to stress management. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were measured 4 times for each subject at pre#1 (8 weeks pre-intervention), pre#2 (immediately pre-8 week intervention), post #1 (immediately post-8 week intervention) and post#2 (8 weeks post-intervention) using a Spacelabs ambulatory monitor with simultaneous activity measurement (Motionlogger actigraph). BP, HR and activity were recorded over a 24-hour period at each measurement. Lipids and subjective stress (Deragotis Stress Profile) were also measured at each of the 4 times. Average age of the subjects was 44.3 (sd=11.0) years; 42% were male; 71% were Anglo-American, 21% African-American, 4% Hispanic and 4% Asian. All had stage-one hypertension; none were taking anti-hypertensive medication. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used. BP and HR analyses were done using restricted maximum likelihood estimation with activity as a covariate. The stress management (SM) group had significantly lower systolic BP (p=.02), HR (p=.03) and total cholesterol (p=.04) over time compared to the group who had no stress management (NO). First and last measurements for systolic BP (SM pre#1, 133.5+18.4 to post#2, 126.8+16.5; NO pre#1, 136.0+16.6 to post#2, 132.3+17.8), HR (SM pre#1, 74.8+14.6 to post#2, 71.1+13.4; NO pre#1, 78.4+14.5 to post#2, 76.6+15.9) and total cholesterol (SM pre#1, 212.1+42.9 to post#2, 188.7+35.4; NO pre#1, 201.8+35.5 to post#2, 205.1+43.6) highlight the group differences. There was no group difference for diastolic BP nor subjective stress. Stress management conducted by advanced practice nurses enhanced the effect of exercise and nutrition counseling on 24 hour ambulatory systolic BP and HR and total cholesterol. Questions arise about the failure to demonstrate subjective stress effects. Implications for future research will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdding stress management to lifestyle intervention to treat stage one hypertensionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLiehr, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Liehr, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston School of Nursing, Houston, Texas, USA, email: Patricia.R.Liehr@uth.tmc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165979-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this pilot study was to examine the impact of adding stress management conducted by advanced practice nurses to structured exercise and nutrition counseling in the treatment of Stage one hypertension. All subjects (n=24) received the exercise and nutrition counseling intervention; 12 of these were randomly assigned to stress management. Blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were measured 4 times for each subject at pre#1 (8 weeks pre-intervention), pre#2 (immediately pre-8 week intervention), post #1 (immediately post-8 week intervention) and post#2 (8 weeks post-intervention) using a Spacelabs ambulatory monitor with simultaneous activity measurement (Motionlogger actigraph). BP, HR and activity were recorded over a 24-hour period at each measurement. Lipids and subjective stress (Deragotis Stress Profile) were also measured at each of the 4 times. Average age of the subjects was 44.3 (sd=11.0) years; 42% were male; 71% were Anglo-American, 21% African-American, 4% Hispanic and 4% Asian. All had stage-one hypertension; none were taking anti-hypertensive medication. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used. BP and HR analyses were done using restricted maximum likelihood estimation with activity as a covariate. The stress management (SM) group had significantly lower systolic BP (p=.02), HR (p=.03) and total cholesterol (p=.04) over time compared to the group who had no stress management (NO). First and last measurements for systolic BP (SM pre#1, 133.5+18.4 to post#2, 126.8+16.5; NO pre#1, 136.0+16.6 to post#2, 132.3+17.8), HR (SM pre#1, 74.8+14.6 to post#2, 71.1+13.4; NO pre#1, 78.4+14.5 to post#2, 76.6+15.9) and total cholesterol (SM pre#1, 212.1+42.9 to post#2, 188.7+35.4; NO pre#1, 201.8+35.5 to post#2, 205.1+43.6) highlight the group differences. There was no group difference for diastolic BP nor subjective stress. Stress management conducted by advanced practice nurses enhanced the effect of exercise and nutrition counseling on 24 hour ambulatory systolic BP and HR and total cholesterol. Questions arise about the failure to demonstrate subjective stress effects. Implications for future research will be discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:44Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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