2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165981
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pain management in people with osteoarthritis
Author(s):
Kee, Carolyn
Author Details:
Carolyn Kee, PhD, Associate Professor, Georgia State University, School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, email: ckee@gsu.edu
Abstract:
Osteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent diagnosis in people over age 60. Pain is the presenting symptom and the one which causes older persons to seek treatment. Chronic OA pain is a serious problem that can lead to depression and disability, yet little information is available that identifies the ways in which nurses help older people with OA manage pain. The purpose of this qualitative research study was to identify the pain management practices of nurses who care for older people with OA. A total of 10 registered nurses (RNS) working in home health agencies in a rural-suburban area of a southeastern state agreed to participate in the study. They signed an informed consent form that included a statement indicating willingness to be tape-recorded. Most data were collected in participant homes where each respondent provided demographic and background data and were interviewed for approximately 1 hour. The semistructured interview schedule focused on OA pain with open-ended responses. Data on age, gender, race, nursing education, and clinical experiences were categorized and summarized. Responses to the interview questions were transcribed and then analyzed using the constant comparative method of data analysis. In order to derive a conceptual schema to organize the findings, the three levels of coding identified by Hutchinson (1986), (in vivo, categorization, and constructs) and used in grounded theory, were employed. All transcripts were read initially by the two co-investigators, first to grasp the essence of the whole and then for data reduction purposes. A peer researcher served as the data auditor. Last, the results of the data analysis were presented to two of the interview participants who confirmed that the summarized findings accurately represented what was true for them. Data analysis yielded two major constructs. The first construct was Understanding Pain. The data revealed that the evolution of the process of caring for older people with chronic OA pain began with Understanding Pain in each individual patient. This construct was derived from the two categories of Knowing How to Assess Pain and Knowing About Pain Treatments. The second major construct of caring for older patients with OA pain was Wanting to Provide Good Nursing Care. These nurse respondents tried hard to achieve positive outcomes yet were often less than successful in doing so. The nurses persevered in their attempts to make things better by relieving pain but were often frustrated, at least partially because they felt they needed to know more. The two categories of Wanting to Provide Good Nursing Care were Trying But Frustrated and Needing More Knowledge. Attaining more formal knowledge about aging processes, pain management strategies, and OA to complement informal knowledge as well as being more assertive, especially with physicians, in trying a variety of intervention strategies would enhance care of the older person with chronic OA pain. It was clear, however, that the nurse participants in this study cared about their patients well-being and such displays of caring might well be the most important aspect of nursing interventions in any disease process.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePain management in people with osteoarthritisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKee, Carolynen_US
dc.author.detailsCarolyn Kee, PhD, Associate Professor, Georgia State University, School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, email: ckee@gsu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165981-
dc.description.abstractOsteoarthritis (OA) is a prevalent diagnosis in people over age 60. Pain is the presenting symptom and the one which causes older persons to seek treatment. Chronic OA pain is a serious problem that can lead to depression and disability, yet little information is available that identifies the ways in which nurses help older people with OA manage pain. The purpose of this qualitative research study was to identify the pain management practices of nurses who care for older people with OA. A total of 10 registered nurses (RNS) working in home health agencies in a rural-suburban area of a southeastern state agreed to participate in the study. They signed an informed consent form that included a statement indicating willingness to be tape-recorded. Most data were collected in participant homes where each respondent provided demographic and background data and were interviewed for approximately 1 hour. The semistructured interview schedule focused on OA pain with open-ended responses. Data on age, gender, race, nursing education, and clinical experiences were categorized and summarized. Responses to the interview questions were transcribed and then analyzed using the constant comparative method of data analysis. In order to derive a conceptual schema to organize the findings, the three levels of coding identified by Hutchinson (1986), (in vivo, categorization, and constructs) and used in grounded theory, were employed. All transcripts were read initially by the two co-investigators, first to grasp the essence of the whole and then for data reduction purposes. A peer researcher served as the data auditor. Last, the results of the data analysis were presented to two of the interview participants who confirmed that the summarized findings accurately represented what was true for them. Data analysis yielded two major constructs. The first construct was Understanding Pain. The data revealed that the evolution of the process of caring for older people with chronic OA pain began with Understanding Pain in each individual patient. This construct was derived from the two categories of Knowing How to Assess Pain and Knowing About Pain Treatments. The second major construct of caring for older patients with OA pain was Wanting to Provide Good Nursing Care. These nurse respondents tried hard to achieve positive outcomes yet were often less than successful in doing so. The nurses persevered in their attempts to make things better by relieving pain but were often frustrated, at least partially because they felt they needed to know more. The two categories of Wanting to Provide Good Nursing Care were Trying But Frustrated and Needing More Knowledge. Attaining more formal knowledge about aging processes, pain management strategies, and OA to complement informal knowledge as well as being more assertive, especially with physicians, in trying a variety of intervention strategies would enhance care of the older person with chronic OA pain. It was clear, however, that the nurse participants in this study cared about their patients well-being and such displays of caring might well be the most important aspect of nursing interventions in any disease process.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:46Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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