Prevalence of mood states among adolescents: Gender, ethnic group and maturation differences and effects on ambulatory blood pressure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165982
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prevalence of mood states among adolescents: Gender, ethnic group and maturation differences and effects on ambulatory blood pressure
Author(s):
Meininger, Janet
Author Details:
Janet Meininger, University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: jmeining@son1.nur.uth.tmc.edu
Abstract:
The purposes of this study were to: 1) estimate the prevalence of mood states in a multi-ethnic sample of adolescents; 2) test for ethnic group, gender and maturation differences in the prevalence of mood states; and 3) investigate the relationships between mood states and ambulatory blood pressure measured during the course of daily activities. To overcome limitations of previous work, variables closely linked with changes in blood pressure that occur during adolescence, height and sexual maturation were measured. The target population was African, European, and Hispanic American adolescents 11 to 16 years old residing in a large, metropolitan city in southeast Texas. A stratified quota sample of 371 adolescents was recruited from public middle and high schools. The dependent variables, systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure, were measured with an ambulatory monitor (Spacelabs 90207). These measurements, taken every 30 minutes during the day, were synchronized with activity monitoring (Motionlogger actigraph). Moods, time of day, position, and location were recorded by the participant each time blood pressure was measured during waking hours using a checklist format. Height and sexual maturation (Tanner ratings) were measured during a physical exam at school by a nurse practitioner. For each participant, ambulatory blood pressure and moods were monitored for a 24-hour interval on a school day. Mixed-effects models for repeated measurements were used for statistical analyses. Positive and neutral moods were more prevalent than negative moods. There were statistically significant (p< .05) differences in moods by gender, ethnic group, and maturation for all moods (stressed, sad, rushed, relaxed, irritable, interested, bored, accomplishing things, happy, excited) except feeling angry. Feeling rushed, excited, happy and angry were associated with higher SBP; feeling relaxed, bored and a sense of accomplishing things were associated with lower SBP. Feeling excited and happy were associated with higher DBP; feeling bored, interested and a sense of accomplishing things were associated with lower DBP (all p< .05). Although the effect sizes were small (0.5 to 2.0 mm Hg), differences of this magnitude have important public health implications. Sources of variation in ambulatory blood pressure will be discussed along with implications of these findings for the design of interventions to lower blood pressure in adolescents.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrevalence of mood states among adolescents: Gender, ethnic group and maturation differences and effects on ambulatory blood pressureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMeininger, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsJanet Meininger, University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: jmeining@son1.nur.uth.tmc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165982-
dc.description.abstractThe purposes of this study were to: 1) estimate the prevalence of mood states in a multi-ethnic sample of adolescents; 2) test for ethnic group, gender and maturation differences in the prevalence of mood states; and 3) investigate the relationships between mood states and ambulatory blood pressure measured during the course of daily activities. To overcome limitations of previous work, variables closely linked with changes in blood pressure that occur during adolescence, height and sexual maturation were measured. The target population was African, European, and Hispanic American adolescents 11 to 16 years old residing in a large, metropolitan city in southeast Texas. A stratified quota sample of 371 adolescents was recruited from public middle and high schools. The dependent variables, systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure, were measured with an ambulatory monitor (Spacelabs 90207). These measurements, taken every 30 minutes during the day, were synchronized with activity monitoring (Motionlogger actigraph). Moods, time of day, position, and location were recorded by the participant each time blood pressure was measured during waking hours using a checklist format. Height and sexual maturation (Tanner ratings) were measured during a physical exam at school by a nurse practitioner. For each participant, ambulatory blood pressure and moods were monitored for a 24-hour interval on a school day. Mixed-effects models for repeated measurements were used for statistical analyses. Positive and neutral moods were more prevalent than negative moods. There were statistically significant (p< .05) differences in moods by gender, ethnic group, and maturation for all moods (stressed, sad, rushed, relaxed, irritable, interested, bored, accomplishing things, happy, excited) except feeling angry. Feeling rushed, excited, happy and angry were associated with higher SBP; feeling relaxed, bored and a sense of accomplishing things were associated with lower SBP. Feeling excited and happy were associated with higher DBP; feeling bored, interested and a sense of accomplishing things were associated with lower DBP (all p< .05). Although the effect sizes were small (0.5 to 2.0 mm Hg), differences of this magnitude have important public health implications. Sources of variation in ambulatory blood pressure will be discussed along with implications of these findings for the design of interventions to lower blood pressure in adolescents.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:47Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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