2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165985
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intervention efficacy in men treated for prostate cancer: Moderator effects
Author(s):
Mishel, Merle
Author Details:
Merle Mishel, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: mishel@email.unc.edu
Abstract:
The Uncertainty Management Intervention (UMI) was delivered to men treated for prostate cancer. This paper will examine moderators that influence intervention efficacy. The moderators considered include age, education, tumor stage, functional status, sources of information, religiosity and faith in God. These factors are used in interaction with treatment group (control, treatment direct [subject only] and treatment supplemented [subject and family member]) and ethnicity (African American and Caucasian) to identify the conditions under which the intervention improves outcomes beyond main effect or ethnic interaction alone. The sample consisted of 234 men (100 African American and 134 Caucasian ) with a mean age of 65 years who were treated for prostate cancer with surgery or external beam radiation therapy. Subjects were recruited from comprehensive cancer centers, community hospitals and private clinics. Data were collected by nurses during home visits at baseline and four and seven months post baseline. Repeated measures MANOVA was used to examine the moderating effects of factors on the intervention and selected outcome variables. Significant results were found for education, tumor stage, sources of information, and religiosity at both time intervals, T1-T2 (baseline - four months) and T2-T3 (four months & seven months). Level of education modified the relationship between the UMI and the outcome measure of cancer knowledge. Tumor stage modified the relationship between the intervention and the ability to achieve an erection. The level of religious participation interacted with the intervention to effect two areas of patient-provider communication. The details concerning differences in moderator effects for African American and Caucasian men will be discussed and their clinical usefulness considered.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntervention efficacy in men treated for prostate cancer: Moderator effectsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMishel, Merleen_US
dc.author.detailsMerle Mishel, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: mishel@email.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165985-
dc.description.abstractThe Uncertainty Management Intervention (UMI) was delivered to men treated for prostate cancer. This paper will examine moderators that influence intervention efficacy. The moderators considered include age, education, tumor stage, functional status, sources of information, religiosity and faith in God. These factors are used in interaction with treatment group (control, treatment direct [subject only] and treatment supplemented [subject and family member]) and ethnicity (African American and Caucasian) to identify the conditions under which the intervention improves outcomes beyond main effect or ethnic interaction alone. The sample consisted of 234 men (100 African American and 134 Caucasian ) with a mean age of 65 years who were treated for prostate cancer with surgery or external beam radiation therapy. Subjects were recruited from comprehensive cancer centers, community hospitals and private clinics. Data were collected by nurses during home visits at baseline and four and seven months post baseline. Repeated measures MANOVA was used to examine the moderating effects of factors on the intervention and selected outcome variables. Significant results were found for education, tumor stage, sources of information, and religiosity at both time intervals, T1-T2 (baseline - four months) and T2-T3 (four months & seven months). Level of education modified the relationship between the UMI and the outcome measure of cancer knowledge. Tumor stage modified the relationship between the intervention and the ability to achieve an erection. The level of religious participation interacted with the intervention to effect two areas of patient-provider communication. The details concerning differences in moderator effects for African American and Caucasian men will be discussed and their clinical usefulness considered.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:51Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.