2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165987
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determining who benefits most: Looking beyond ethnicity
Author(s):
Mishel, Merle
Author Details:
Merle Mishel, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: mishel@email.unc.edu
Abstract:
Ethnic differences in intervention outcomes are a common consideration in health research. However, it is widely recognized that ethnicity by itself does not account for the social, economic, and/or cultural factors that may influence outcomes of interest. By examining the moderating effects of a pre-determined set of personal, contextual, and disease-related factors on the effectiveness of the Uncertainty Management Intervention (UMI), we were able to look beyond ethnicity to determine which subjects benefited most from the intervention. In 2 separate studies of the UMI, 102 African American women with breast cancer younger than 50 (mean age 41.4 yrs., s.d. 5.5) and 104 African American women with breast cancer older than 50 (mean age 63.3 yrs., s.d. 9.1) were randomly assigned to intervention and control conditions, and outcomes were evaluated 2 months post-intervention and 3 months later. In the study including older women, there were significant intervention effects in improving cognitive coping, facilitating effective patient-provider communication, and reducing symptom distress, but few moderators of the intervention. In the study including younger women, there were no main effects for the intervention at either time point, but evaluation of moderator effects demonstrated significant intervention outcomes for several subgroups of women. Lower income, fewer sources of information at baseline, lower functional status (physical and instrumental activities of daily living), and higher tumor stage, predicted intervention effectiveness in improving uncertainty management and decreasing symptom distress. Considered together, these findings suggest that for African American women, ethnicity is not sufficient to explain who benefits most from an intervention and why. These moderating effects are informative about who is most sensitive to the intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDetermining who benefits most: Looking beyond ethnicityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMishel, Merleen_US
dc.author.detailsMerle Mishel, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: mishel@email.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165987-
dc.description.abstractEthnic differences in intervention outcomes are a common consideration in health research. However, it is widely recognized that ethnicity by itself does not account for the social, economic, and/or cultural factors that may influence outcomes of interest. By examining the moderating effects of a pre-determined set of personal, contextual, and disease-related factors on the effectiveness of the Uncertainty Management Intervention (UMI), we were able to look beyond ethnicity to determine which subjects benefited most from the intervention. In 2 separate studies of the UMI, 102 African American women with breast cancer younger than 50 (mean age 41.4 yrs., s.d. 5.5) and 104 African American women with breast cancer older than 50 (mean age 63.3 yrs., s.d. 9.1) were randomly assigned to intervention and control conditions, and outcomes were evaluated 2 months post-intervention and 3 months later. In the study including older women, there were significant intervention effects in improving cognitive coping, facilitating effective patient-provider communication, and reducing symptom distress, but few moderators of the intervention. In the study including younger women, there were no main effects for the intervention at either time point, but evaluation of moderator effects demonstrated significant intervention outcomes for several subgroups of women. Lower income, fewer sources of information at baseline, lower functional status (physical and instrumental activities of daily living), and higher tumor stage, predicted intervention effectiveness in improving uncertainty management and decreasing symptom distress. Considered together, these findings suggest that for African American women, ethnicity is not sufficient to explain who benefits most from an intervention and why. These moderating effects are informative about who is most sensitive to the intervention.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:54Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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