2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165990
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Why are moderators important? What can we learn from them
Author(s):
Mishel, Merle
Author Details:
Merle Mishel, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: mishel@email.unc.edu
Abstract:
Is Intervention A more effective than intervention B? Do all subjects with a specific problem benefit more from one type of nursing intervention more than another type? Or might it be the case that subjects sharing a certain characteristic benefit more from one type of intervention, whereas others sharing another characteristic benefit more from another type of intervention. This implies an interaction between subject and intervention characteristics. This presentation will discuss the importance and potential benefits of an interactionally oriented approach to the study of benefit from an intervention. It will emphasize the advantages of going beyond seeking main effects and will provide the conceptual orientation to the study of moderator variables that is the basis for the symposium presentations. In a health care environment in which cost of care is a major factor, there is emphasis on providing care to those who can benefit the most and on the efficient use of resources. Thus, it is imperative that we, as investigators, seek interaction rather than main effects. In order to identify interactions, a number of questions need to be addressed. One question concerns the decisions about types of subject factors to be considered. A second question concerns the number of factors, and a third question concerns the nature of the intervention with which these factors are expected to interact. A fourth question concerns the specific outcomes that the interactions are expected to influence. A fifth question concerns the purposes such research can usefully serve in the study of nursing interventions. Addressing these questions will provide the content of the integrative paper for the symposium. Study of moderator effects is enhanced when there are multiple clinical trials of the intervention and variability introduced by the nature of the subjects enrolled in each trial. Holding the type of moderators constant and varying the nature of the subjects enables investigators to identify which subject characteristics interact with treatment across clinical samples. In the papers to be presented, The intervention tested was an Uncertainty Management Intervention, which is a theory-based intervention. According to the principles of theory-based interventions, personal, contextual and disease factors should be considered for their impact on the subject. Thus, moderators were selected that addressed these three areas: age, education, functional status, (personal factors), tumor stage (disease factors), sources of information, religiosity and faith in God (contextual factors). Other moderators that were specific to a clinical sample and included for only selected samples were language preference and income level. The tests of these moderators across three studies will be reported. The samples were ethnically diverse including Caucasian, African-American, and Mexican-American. Both genders are represented, as are different age groups.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhy are moderators important? What can we learn from themen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMishel, Merleen_US
dc.author.detailsMerle Mishel, PhD, Professor, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: mishel@email.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165990-
dc.description.abstractIs Intervention A more effective than intervention B? Do all subjects with a specific problem benefit more from one type of nursing intervention more than another type? Or might it be the case that subjects sharing a certain characteristic benefit more from one type of intervention, whereas others sharing another characteristic benefit more from another type of intervention. This implies an interaction between subject and intervention characteristics. This presentation will discuss the importance and potential benefits of an interactionally oriented approach to the study of benefit from an intervention. It will emphasize the advantages of going beyond seeking main effects and will provide the conceptual orientation to the study of moderator variables that is the basis for the symposium presentations. In a health care environment in which cost of care is a major factor, there is emphasis on providing care to those who can benefit the most and on the efficient use of resources. Thus, it is imperative that we, as investigators, seek interaction rather than main effects. In order to identify interactions, a number of questions need to be addressed. One question concerns the decisions about types of subject factors to be considered. A second question concerns the number of factors, and a third question concerns the nature of the intervention with which these factors are expected to interact. A fourth question concerns the specific outcomes that the interactions are expected to influence. A fifth question concerns the purposes such research can usefully serve in the study of nursing interventions. Addressing these questions will provide the content of the integrative paper for the symposium. Study of moderator effects is enhanced when there are multiple clinical trials of the intervention and variability introduced by the nature of the subjects enrolled in each trial. Holding the type of moderators constant and varying the nature of the subjects enables investigators to identify which subject characteristics interact with treatment across clinical samples. In the papers to be presented, The intervention tested was an Uncertainty Management Intervention, which is a theory-based intervention. According to the principles of theory-based interventions, personal, contextual and disease factors should be considered for their impact on the subject. Thus, moderators were selected that addressed these three areas: age, education, functional status, (personal factors), tumor stage (disease factors), sources of information, religiosity and faith in God (contextual factors). Other moderators that were specific to a clinical sample and included for only selected samples were language preference and income level. The tests of these moderators across three studies will be reported. The samples were ethnically diverse including Caucasian, African-American, and Mexican-American. Both genders are represented, as are different age groups.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:37:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:37:57Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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