2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165993
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recovery from traumatic injury: An integrative review of qualitative research
Author(s):
VanHorn, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Elizabeth VanHorn, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: ervanhor@uncg.edu
Abstract:
Trauma is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States and a major cause of disability. Research on trauma patients to date has focused on recovery outcomes of the post-trauma patient at discrete points in time after injury and has not adequately addressed the processes inherent in recovery. However, qualitative literature examining recovery from traumatic injury as a process has begun to emerge in the nursing research literature. The development of a more global understanding of the process of recovery through qualitative research is a necessary precursor to the development and testing of theoretically based nursing interventions to facilitate positive outcomes for trauma patients. The purpose of this paper is to examine the state of knowledge of the recovery process following traumatic injury through an integrative literature review of qualitative research. Studies included in this integrative review focus on recovery from traumatic injury and use qualitative methodology. A total of five qualitative studies, published 1992 to 1999, that utilized prospective ethnography, transactional phenomenology, and grounded theory methodologies were analyzed. Types of traumatic injury varied and included those from motor vehicle, motorcycle, and airplane crashes, gunshot wounds, burns, and other life-threatening injuries. Sample sizes ranged from 16 to 30 subjects, with a total of 105 men and women ranging from 18 to 85 years of age. Interviewing was the most common method of data collection. Content analysis was conducted on the five selected studies to identify common themes and areas for future research in the trauma recovery process. Additionally, each study was evaluated for quality according to methods outlined by Burns (1989). A recovery process comprised of six stages was identified in this review. The stages include denial and minimization, facing reality, grieving and depression, regaining control, waiting through time, and redefining the self. As subjects moved through this process they identified barriers to recovery that were psychosocial, physical, environmental, and societal in nature. The factors that facilitated the process of recovery included resources such as social support and individual coping methods. Successful completion of the process of recovery produced an individual experience of personal growth as a result of surviving and enduring a traumatic injury. Directions for future research include exploration into the abilities of trauma patients to give positive meanings to deleterious events, the influences of intra and interpersonal resources, and perceived barriers to recovery. Knowledge in these areas will aid in the development of nursing interventions tailored to meeting the needs of trauma patients during the recovery process.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecovery from traumatic injury: An integrative review of qualitative researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorVanHorn, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth VanHorn, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: ervanhor@uncg.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165993-
dc.description.abstractTrauma is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States and a major cause of disability. Research on trauma patients to date has focused on recovery outcomes of the post-trauma patient at discrete points in time after injury and has not adequately addressed the processes inherent in recovery. However, qualitative literature examining recovery from traumatic injury as a process has begun to emerge in the nursing research literature. The development of a more global understanding of the process of recovery through qualitative research is a necessary precursor to the development and testing of theoretically based nursing interventions to facilitate positive outcomes for trauma patients. The purpose of this paper is to examine the state of knowledge of the recovery process following traumatic injury through an integrative literature review of qualitative research. Studies included in this integrative review focus on recovery from traumatic injury and use qualitative methodology. A total of five qualitative studies, published 1992 to 1999, that utilized prospective ethnography, transactional phenomenology, and grounded theory methodologies were analyzed. Types of traumatic injury varied and included those from motor vehicle, motorcycle, and airplane crashes, gunshot wounds, burns, and other life-threatening injuries. Sample sizes ranged from 16 to 30 subjects, with a total of 105 men and women ranging from 18 to 85 years of age. Interviewing was the most common method of data collection. Content analysis was conducted on the five selected studies to identify common themes and areas for future research in the trauma recovery process. Additionally, each study was evaluated for quality according to methods outlined by Burns (1989). A recovery process comprised of six stages was identified in this review. The stages include denial and minimization, facing reality, grieving and depression, regaining control, waiting through time, and redefining the self. As subjects moved through this process they identified barriers to recovery that were psychosocial, physical, environmental, and societal in nature. The factors that facilitated the process of recovery included resources such as social support and individual coping methods. Successful completion of the process of recovery produced an individual experience of personal growth as a result of surviving and enduring a traumatic injury. Directions for future research include exploration into the abilities of trauma patients to give positive meanings to deleterious events, the influences of intra and interpersonal resources, and perceived barriers to recovery. Knowledge in these areas will aid in the development of nursing interventions tailored to meeting the needs of trauma patients during the recovery process.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:01Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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