2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/165995
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Focusing of Quality Patient Care: Contributions From Research
Author(s):
Mobley, Deborah
Author Details:
Deborah Mobley, MS/MSc, Nurse Manager for Quality Processes, Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: dmobley@vcu.edu
Abstract:
Until recently continuous improvement and research have been seen as mutually exclusive. Now in the era of rightsizing, reorganization and reengineering all efforts must compliment and challenge one another. This is particularly significant in an environment that gives all the appearances of organized chaos. The continuous improvement process seeks to provide mechanisms that guide and support the mission and values of the Medical College of Virginia Hospitals (MCVH) in providing quality patient care, education and research. The continuous improvement process at MCVH is in transition as we adapt to the current industry movements and JCAHO standards which emphasize multidisciplinary team efforts, and collaboration in the provision and continuum of patient care. These efforts include the development of clinical pathways, emphasis on case management and integration of ambulatory services into the continuous improvement process. Research and continuous improvement have a great deal in common. Qualitative and quantitative methods easily compare to the continuous improvement methodologies, however a different language is used to describe the methods. In addition, the development of action science, a type of qualitative study, was developed to study systems, implement solutions, and evaluate results, thus bridging the gap between continuous improvement and research. Since the underlying skills of research and continuous improvement are similar, the continuous improvement process has benefitted greatly from a strong research focus in the institution. A member of our research team attends continuous improvement meetings and advises on a number of topics such as data collection methods, measurement, and analysis. Two projects will be used as examples in which our research program contributed significantly to our efforts. These are (1) the measurement of pain satisfaction and (2) assessment of falls. The future holds great wealth for our patients in the new humanistic paradigm which encourages examining processes rather than reductionistic approaches which examine the effects of one variable while controlling for many variables. As we move toward an integrated practice of continuous improvement and research, we will seek to improve our data collection techniques (less dependance on retrospective chart review), measurement tool development, and data analysis. Today's unthinkable possibilities will become tomorrow's solutions as researchers and continuous improvement practitioners continue to dialogue and practice collaboratively.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFocusing of Quality Patient Care: Contributions From Researchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMobley, Deborahen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Mobley, MS/MSc, Nurse Manager for Quality Processes, Medical College of Virginia Hospitals, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: dmobley@vcu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/165995-
dc.description.abstractUntil recently continuous improvement and research have been seen as mutually exclusive. Now in the era of rightsizing, reorganization and reengineering all efforts must compliment and challenge one another. This is particularly significant in an environment that gives all the appearances of organized chaos. The continuous improvement process seeks to provide mechanisms that guide and support the mission and values of the Medical College of Virginia Hospitals (MCVH) in providing quality patient care, education and research. The continuous improvement process at MCVH is in transition as we adapt to the current industry movements and JCAHO standards which emphasize multidisciplinary team efforts, and collaboration in the provision and continuum of patient care. These efforts include the development of clinical pathways, emphasis on case management and integration of ambulatory services into the continuous improvement process. Research and continuous improvement have a great deal in common. Qualitative and quantitative methods easily compare to the continuous improvement methodologies, however a different language is used to describe the methods. In addition, the development of action science, a type of qualitative study, was developed to study systems, implement solutions, and evaluate results, thus bridging the gap between continuous improvement and research. Since the underlying skills of research and continuous improvement are similar, the continuous improvement process has benefitted greatly from a strong research focus in the institution. A member of our research team attends continuous improvement meetings and advises on a number of topics such as data collection methods, measurement, and analysis. Two projects will be used as examples in which our research program contributed significantly to our efforts. These are (1) the measurement of pain satisfaction and (2) assessment of falls. The future holds great wealth for our patients in the new humanistic paradigm which encourages examining processes rather than reductionistic approaches which examine the effects of one variable while controlling for many variables. As we move toward an integrated practice of continuous improvement and research, we will seek to improve our data collection techniques (less dependance on retrospective chart review), measurement tool development, and data analysis. Today's unthinkable possibilities will become tomorrow's solutions as researchers and continuous improvement practitioners continue to dialogue and practice collaboratively.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:03Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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