2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166002
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Anxiety in Critically Ill Patients
Author(s):
Herman, Joanne
Author Details:
Joanne Herman, PhD, Associate Dean, University of South Carolina-Columbia, College of Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: joanne.herman@sc.edu
Abstract:
Measurement of self-report cognitive and affective data from critically ill subjects can be very difficult. However, the search for solutions to this challenge is necessary because knowledge about the relationships among cognitive, affective, and physiological functioning of critically ill patients is vital for the development of a theoretical base for critical care nursing practice. Traditional instruments pose particular problems because of their high cognitive demand. The visual analogue scale (VAS) requires less cognitive concentration and is easier and quicker to complete than most instruments. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish validity for a VAS to measure anxiety in critically ill patients. Concurrent validity was tested by comparing subject scores on two instruments: Speilberger State Anxiety Inventory (SAI) and a researcher generated Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Construct validity was tested by comparing subject scores for those on ventilators and those not. It was hypothesized that subjects on ventilators would have higher anxiety than subjects who were not on ventilators. The sample consisted of 53 subjects about evenly divided between women (24) and men (29). The mean age was 52 years with a range of 20-77. The majority of subjects had a high school education and were Caucasian, married, and retired. Twenty-four of the subjects were on a ventilator and 29 were not. After informed consent was obtained, subject's blood pressure and pulse were recorded. Then subjects completed the VAS and SAI. The questionnaires were completed in a randomly assigned order. The mean VAS score for anxiety was 25 with a sd of 31 and a range of 0-100. The mean SAI score was 40 with a standard deviation of 14 and a range of 20-79. The Pearson correlation between the VAS and SAI was .81. There were no significant correlations between systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse and either the VAS or the SAI. T-test analysis of VAS scores between the ventilator group and the non-ventilator group revealed a statistically significant difference. Subjects in the ventilator group scored significantly higher (33) than non-ventilator subjects (19). Findings from this study establish preliminary validity for the VAS to measure anxiety in critically ill patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Anxiety in Critically Ill Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHerman, Joanneen_US
dc.author.detailsJoanne Herman, PhD, Associate Dean, University of South Carolina-Columbia, College of Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: joanne.herman@sc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166002-
dc.description.abstractMeasurement of self-report cognitive and affective data from critically ill subjects can be very difficult. However, the search for solutions to this challenge is necessary because knowledge about the relationships among cognitive, affective, and physiological functioning of critically ill patients is vital for the development of a theoretical base for critical care nursing practice. Traditional instruments pose particular problems because of their high cognitive demand. The visual analogue scale (VAS) requires less cognitive concentration and is easier and quicker to complete than most instruments. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish validity for a VAS to measure anxiety in critically ill patients. Concurrent validity was tested by comparing subject scores on two instruments: Speilberger State Anxiety Inventory (SAI) and a researcher generated Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Construct validity was tested by comparing subject scores for those on ventilators and those not. It was hypothesized that subjects on ventilators would have higher anxiety than subjects who were not on ventilators. The sample consisted of 53 subjects about evenly divided between women (24) and men (29). The mean age was 52 years with a range of 20-77. The majority of subjects had a high school education and were Caucasian, married, and retired. Twenty-four of the subjects were on a ventilator and 29 were not. After informed consent was obtained, subject's blood pressure and pulse were recorded. Then subjects completed the VAS and SAI. The questionnaires were completed in a randomly assigned order. The mean VAS score for anxiety was 25 with a sd of 31 and a range of 0-100. The mean SAI score was 40 with a standard deviation of 14 and a range of 20-79. The Pearson correlation between the VAS and SAI was .81. There were no significant correlations between systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse and either the VAS or the SAI. T-test analysis of VAS scores between the ventilator group and the non-ventilator group revealed a statistically significant difference. Subjects in the ventilator group scored significantly higher (33) than non-ventilator subjects (19). Findings from this study establish preliminary validity for the VAS to measure anxiety in critically ill patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:12Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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