The relationship between pain disclosure and perceived confirmation in the experience of postoperative clients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166006
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The relationship between pain disclosure and perceived confirmation in the experience of postoperative clients
Author(s):
Muar, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Muar, PhD, Tallahassee Community College, Tallahassee, Florida, USA, email: muarp@mail.tallahassee.cc.fl.u
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between client disclosure of postoperative incisional pain to nursing caregivers and client perception of caregiver response to previous pain disclosure. The question posed by the study was asked as follows: Does perception of confirmation in caregiver response to previous pain disclosure provide for significantly better classification of clients into groups than does the combination of perceived pain intensity, perceived distress from pain, client control of analgesic medication, and trait anxiety? The theoretical framework for this investigation was drawn from King's Theory for Nursing and Siebold's Theory of Confirmation in Interpersonal Communication. Data was collected from 60 adults age 22 to 69 years who were hospitalized for elective surgery requiring a hospital stay of at least 48 hours. Forty participants were male and 20 female. Thirty-two percent reported less than 12 years of formal education. Sixty-two percent were married. Variables controlled in the process of sample selection included age, ethnicity, personal history of chronic pain and experience with a family member having chronic pain. Participants were interviewed preoperatively including completion of the State/Trait Anxiety Inventory and instruction in the use of a visual analogue scale. On the evening of their first postoperative day, participants were asked to describe their experience the first time they got out of bed after surgery. They were asked to describe perceived pain intensity and distress using a 10 cm visual analogue scale. They were asked whether they told the caregiver that they were experiencing pain. Those who answered affirmatively were asked to use a visual analogue scale to describe the amount of distress communicated to the caregiver. All participants completed the Perceived Confirmation Scale to describe how caregivers made them feel when they talked about their pain. Ten of 60 participants (16.6%) did not disclose the presence of pain to the caregiver. Discriminant function analysis showed a 10% improvement in correct classification of the sample into disclosure or nondisclosure groups when confirmation scores were included in the analysis. Participant gender was not controlled in sample selection. A t-test for independent samples showed significant differences in expressed distress scores by gender. Mean expressed distress scores for females were greater than those for males. Participants who reported experiencing less distress than disclosed to the caregiver had significantly lower mean confirmation scores than those who reported the same or more distress (F=3.75, p=.03). Females were more likely to disclose less distress to the caregiver than they reported experiencing (chisq=11.69, p=.003). Males were more likely to disclose the same amount of distress they reported. The study findings suggest that perception of confirmation in caregiver response to previous pain disclosure is related to disclosure of pain to caregivers. The number of females in the sample was quite small, but the results also suggest that gender may be a mediating factor in this relationship. The relationship between pain disclosure and confirmation merits further study. Caregivers who are open to patient reports of pain and accepting of their validity may encourage accurate reporting of the presence and intensity of pain especially from female clients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe relationship between pain disclosure and perceived confirmation in the experience of postoperative clientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMuar, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Muar, PhD, Tallahassee Community College, Tallahassee, Florida, USA, email: muarp@mail.tallahassee.cc.fl.uen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166006-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the possible relationship between client disclosure of postoperative incisional pain to nursing caregivers and client perception of caregiver response to previous pain disclosure. The question posed by the study was asked as follows: Does perception of confirmation in caregiver response to previous pain disclosure provide for significantly better classification of clients into groups than does the combination of perceived pain intensity, perceived distress from pain, client control of analgesic medication, and trait anxiety? The theoretical framework for this investigation was drawn from King's Theory for Nursing and Siebold's Theory of Confirmation in Interpersonal Communication. Data was collected from 60 adults age 22 to 69 years who were hospitalized for elective surgery requiring a hospital stay of at least 48 hours. Forty participants were male and 20 female. Thirty-two percent reported less than 12 years of formal education. Sixty-two percent were married. Variables controlled in the process of sample selection included age, ethnicity, personal history of chronic pain and experience with a family member having chronic pain. Participants were interviewed preoperatively including completion of the State/Trait Anxiety Inventory and instruction in the use of a visual analogue scale. On the evening of their first postoperative day, participants were asked to describe their experience the first time they got out of bed after surgery. They were asked to describe perceived pain intensity and distress using a 10 cm visual analogue scale. They were asked whether they told the caregiver that they were experiencing pain. Those who answered affirmatively were asked to use a visual analogue scale to describe the amount of distress communicated to the caregiver. All participants completed the Perceived Confirmation Scale to describe how caregivers made them feel when they talked about their pain. Ten of 60 participants (16.6%) did not disclose the presence of pain to the caregiver. Discriminant function analysis showed a 10% improvement in correct classification of the sample into disclosure or nondisclosure groups when confirmation scores were included in the analysis. Participant gender was not controlled in sample selection. A t-test for independent samples showed significant differences in expressed distress scores by gender. Mean expressed distress scores for females were greater than those for males. Participants who reported experiencing less distress than disclosed to the caregiver had significantly lower mean confirmation scores than those who reported the same or more distress (F=3.75, p=.03). Females were more likely to disclose less distress to the caregiver than they reported experiencing (chisq=11.69, p=.003). Males were more likely to disclose the same amount of distress they reported. The study findings suggest that perception of confirmation in caregiver response to previous pain disclosure is related to disclosure of pain to caregivers. The number of females in the sample was quite small, but the results also suggest that gender may be a mediating factor in this relationship. The relationship between pain disclosure and confirmation merits further study. Caregivers who are open to patient reports of pain and accepting of their validity may encourage accurate reporting of the presence and intensity of pain especially from female clients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:17Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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