Cognitive-behavioral approaches for postoperative pain management with adults: A meta-analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166007
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive-behavioral approaches for postoperative pain management with adults: A meta-analysis
Author(s):
Laframboise, Joanne
Author Details:
Joanne Laframboise, MScN, University of Florida, College of Nursing, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: lafrajm.ufcon@shands.ufl.edu
Abstract:
Non-pharmacological interventions have been recommended for use with surgical patients as adjuvant therapies along with narcotic analgesia to relieve acute postoperative pain. The efficacy of cognitive-behavioral approaches for postoperative pain management has been examined empirically; however, the types of surgical patient groups sampled, cognitive-behavioral approaches examined, implementation procedures used, and outcome variables measured to determine treatment effects varied considerably, making it difficult to make inferences about the efficacy of these approaches. The specific aim of this study was to obtain published experimental studies from the past 15 years in which the cognitive-behavioral appraoches of simple relaxation, music therapy, and pleasant imagery were examined. Twelve "subject-studies" met the inclusion criteria and comprised the sample for this meta-analytic review. Methodologic and substantiative study characteristics (independent variables) were coded using a published prototype tool. Seven outcome measures, including self-report and behavioral responses, were used to measure treatment effects on postoperative pain (dependent variable). A total of twenty-eight individual effect sizes were calculated. Weighted, mean effect sizes for the seven outcome measures ranged from -0.36 to -1.08 (a negative direction for effect indicated a favorable outcome for the treatment group). From a clinical perspective, these data can be interpreted as subjects in an experimental group experienced, on average, a 27% reduction in postoperative pain when compared with 71% of subjects in the control group. Results from this quantitative review support the recommendations put forth by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in the 1992 publication, Clinical Practice Guideline, Acute Pain Management: Operative or Medical Procedures and Trauma.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive-behavioral approaches for postoperative pain management with adults: A meta-analysisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLaframboise, Joanneen_US
dc.author.detailsJoanne Laframboise, MScN, University of Florida, College of Nursing, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: lafrajm.ufcon@shands.ufl.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166007-
dc.description.abstractNon-pharmacological interventions have been recommended for use with surgical patients as adjuvant therapies along with narcotic analgesia to relieve acute postoperative pain. The efficacy of cognitive-behavioral approaches for postoperative pain management has been examined empirically; however, the types of surgical patient groups sampled, cognitive-behavioral approaches examined, implementation procedures used, and outcome variables measured to determine treatment effects varied considerably, making it difficult to make inferences about the efficacy of these approaches. The specific aim of this study was to obtain published experimental studies from the past 15 years in which the cognitive-behavioral appraoches of simple relaxation, music therapy, and pleasant imagery were examined. Twelve "subject-studies" met the inclusion criteria and comprised the sample for this meta-analytic review. Methodologic and substantiative study characteristics (independent variables) were coded using a published prototype tool. Seven outcome measures, including self-report and behavioral responses, were used to measure treatment effects on postoperative pain (dependent variable). A total of twenty-eight individual effect sizes were calculated. Weighted, mean effect sizes for the seven outcome measures ranged from -0.36 to -1.08 (a negative direction for effect indicated a favorable outcome for the treatment group). From a clinical perspective, these data can be interpreted as subjects in an experimental group experienced, on average, a 27% reduction in postoperative pain when compared with 71% of subjects in the control group. Results from this quantitative review support the recommendations put forth by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in the 1992 publication, Clinical Practice Guideline, Acute Pain Management: Operative or Medical Procedures and Trauma.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:18Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.