2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166008
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Enhancing Growth in Children
Author(s):
Reifsnider, Elizabeth
Author Details:
Elizabeth Reifsnider, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: reifsnider@uthscsa.edu
Abstract:
The specific aim of the study was to investigate the effects of a community health nursing intervention on children with growth delay enrolled in WIC in central Texas. Hypotheses concerning growth quotients for weight, length, daily intake of calories and protein, parent-child interaction, home environment, community life skills and perceived stress of the mother were tested in a pre-test, post-test design with a sample of 39 children with growth delay, randomly assigned to control or experimental groups. The children were identified in WIC clinics in local health departments as being growth delayed. Their families were contacted by the researcher and invited to participate in a study on children's growth, but the families were not informed as to which group their child bad been assigned. The instruments used were: a balance-beam infant scale, an infant length board, a 24-hour diet recall and a four-day prospective food record, the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) Inventory, Community Life Skills Scale (CLSS), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Infant and Toddler Temperament Scale/Questionnaire. Following preliminary data collection for the entire sample, a nursing intervention was administered to the experimental group during home visits. The intervention included education on nutrition, parenting and community life skills. Posttest data were collected on the two groups by a research assistant blind to group assignment. The data was analyzed using independent t-tests for the growth quotients for weight and height, and dependent t-tests for the data on daily intake of calories and protein, and a MANOVA for the HOME, CLSS and PSS. Quantitative findings, (at p<.05) indicated positive changes in the experimental group's weight growth quotient, diet, home environment, and maternal perceived stress. For this presentation, the focus will be on the data concerning weight and dietary intake. This research has demonstrated that community health nurses through use of targeted interventions on parenting and nutrition education may assist parents in ameliorating the effects of growth delay on their children.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnhancing Growth in Childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReifsnider, Elizabethen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Reifsnider, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: reifsnider@uthscsa.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166008-
dc.description.abstractThe specific aim of the study was to investigate the effects of a community health nursing intervention on children with growth delay enrolled in WIC in central Texas. Hypotheses concerning growth quotients for weight, length, daily intake of calories and protein, parent-child interaction, home environment, community life skills and perceived stress of the mother were tested in a pre-test, post-test design with a sample of 39 children with growth delay, randomly assigned to control or experimental groups. The children were identified in WIC clinics in local health departments as being growth delayed. Their families were contacted by the researcher and invited to participate in a study on children's growth, but the families were not informed as to which group their child bad been assigned. The instruments used were: a balance-beam infant scale, an infant length board, a 24-hour diet recall and a four-day prospective food record, the Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment (HOME) Inventory, Community Life Skills Scale (CLSS), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and the Infant and Toddler Temperament Scale/Questionnaire. Following preliminary data collection for the entire sample, a nursing intervention was administered to the experimental group during home visits. The intervention included education on nutrition, parenting and community life skills. Posttest data were collected on the two groups by a research assistant blind to group assignment. The data was analyzed using independent t-tests for the growth quotients for weight and height, and dependent t-tests for the data on daily intake of calories and protein, and a MANOVA for the HOME, CLSS and PSS. Quantitative findings, (at p<.05) indicated positive changes in the experimental group's weight growth quotient, diet, home environment, and maternal perceived stress. For this presentation, the focus will be on the data concerning weight and dietary intake. This research has demonstrated that community health nurses through use of targeted interventions on parenting and nutrition education may assist parents in ameliorating the effects of growth delay on their children.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:19Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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