2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166009
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Weight-related distress after childbirth
Author(s):
Walker, Lorraine
Author Details:
Lorraine Walker, PhD, Professor,University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: walkerl@mail.utexas.edu
Abstract:
Following recent increases in how much weight women are advised to gain during pregnancy, concern exists that some women may become overweight following childbirth. At present, experts estimate the U.S. women retain an average of 2.2 lb (1 kg) as a result of childbearing. This modest average gain, however, masks great variability in gains, with some women having substantial gains after childbirth. Moreover, increasingly precise scientific measurement of weight gain related to childbearing fails to take into account an additional dimension: how women psychologically experience such weight gain. As a result, the aim of this paper is to describe the phenomenon of weight-related distress after childbirth and the characteristics of women who experience such distress. As part of a larger postpartum survey, women were asked to give brief, open-ended descriptions of their feelings about their current weight. The survey was conducted 2.5 to 6 months after women had given birth. Of 244 women who participated in the survey, 239 provided usable statements regarding their weight. Two of these were omitted because of incomplete data or failing to meet study criteria for inclusion. Women's weight-related statements were coded into 6 categories which ranged from seeing themselves as underweight to experiencing weight-related distress. Such distress was indicated by comments that mentioned loss of self-esteem, feeling awful about current weight, or other comments that indicated more than mild dissatisfaction with weight. Approximately 10% of women were classified as experiencing weight-related distress. Analyses are underway to identify sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics of women who experienced weight-related distress. These will be presented with an eye to identifying profile of women likely to experience weight-related distress. Overall, women who experience weight-related distress had higher weight gains during pregnancy, higher body image dissatisfaction at postpartum, and higher amounts of postpartum weight gain. Other factors such as infant birth weight and maternal age were not associated with weight-related distress.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWeight-related distress after childbirthen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Lorraineen_US
dc.author.detailsLorraine Walker, PhD, Professor,University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: walkerl@mail.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166009-
dc.description.abstractFollowing recent increases in how much weight women are advised to gain during pregnancy, concern exists that some women may become overweight following childbirth. At present, experts estimate the U.S. women retain an average of 2.2 lb (1 kg) as a result of childbearing. This modest average gain, however, masks great variability in gains, with some women having substantial gains after childbirth. Moreover, increasingly precise scientific measurement of weight gain related to childbearing fails to take into account an additional dimension: how women psychologically experience such weight gain. As a result, the aim of this paper is to describe the phenomenon of weight-related distress after childbirth and the characteristics of women who experience such distress. As part of a larger postpartum survey, women were asked to give brief, open-ended descriptions of their feelings about their current weight. The survey was conducted 2.5 to 6 months after women had given birth. Of 244 women who participated in the survey, 239 provided usable statements regarding their weight. Two of these were omitted because of incomplete data or failing to meet study criteria for inclusion. Women's weight-related statements were coded into 6 categories which ranged from seeing themselves as underweight to experiencing weight-related distress. Such distress was indicated by comments that mentioned loss of self-esteem, feeling awful about current weight, or other comments that indicated more than mild dissatisfaction with weight. Approximately 10% of women were classified as experiencing weight-related distress. Analyses are underway to identify sociodemographic and anthropometric characteristics of women who experienced weight-related distress. These will be presented with an eye to identifying profile of women likely to experience weight-related distress. Overall, women who experience weight-related distress had higher weight gains during pregnancy, higher body image dissatisfaction at postpartum, and higher amounts of postpartum weight gain. Other factors such as infant birth weight and maternal age were not associated with weight-related distress.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:20Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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