Examining the Relationship Between Nonpurge Binge Eating Severity and Weight inWomen Using the Set Point Theory

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166011
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Examining the Relationship Between Nonpurge Binge Eating Severity and Weight inWomen Using the Set Point Theory
Author(s):
Timmerman, Gayle
Author Details:
Gayle Timmerman, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: gtimmerman@mail.utexas.edu
Abstract:
The purpose of this presentation is to examine the relationship between nonpurge binge eating severity and weight in women using the set point theory as the conceptual framework. Selected findings from a research study with a voluntary sample of nonpurge binge eating women from varying age groups will be used to provide a better understanding of how the set point theory can be used to explain the relationship of nonpurge binge eating and weight. Nonpurge binge eating is the uncontrolled eating of a large amount of food in a specific period of time without compensatory purging behaviors characteristic of bulimia nervosa. Although binge eating is a prevalent problem in the obese population (20-50%), the relationship between binge eating and degree of obesity has not been adequately explored. According to the set point theory of energy regulation, weight is regulated within the parameters of a specific level or set point. Stability is maintained by balancing energy intake with energy expenditure. However, the increased metabolic rate associated with increased energy intake appears to be temporary. Past research findings indicate that the set point can become elevated with prolonged overfeeding of high fat diets. Obesity is thought to represent the regulation of weight at an elevated set point. Based on the set point theory, a model for binge-induced obesity was hypothesized for this study: 1) when binge episodes become a frequent, regular pattern, the body's set point would become elevated; and 2) a long history of binge eating would contribute to degree of obesity by progressively elevating the set point. In this study, binge eating severity was measured by adding the calorie intake during each binge episode (> 1,000 kcal/episode) as recorded in food diaries over 28 days. Degree of obesity was measured by percent of body fat and body mass index (BMI). Binge eating severity had a low, but significant association with BMI and was not significantly related to percent of body fat. The low correlations failed to support the proposed model for binge-induced obesity. The large fluctuations in binge eating patterns may explain the low correlations between binge eating severity and degree of obesity. The variability in binge frequency and amount consumed during binges over time contradicts the assumption that binge episodes become frequent and regular enough to elevate the set point. Thus, the binge-induced model for obesity may only hold true for the subset of binge eaters with a progressive increase in binge eating severity over time. Another possible explanation may be that amount of fat consumed during binges, rather than the amount of calories, has a stronger relationship to degree of obesity.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExamining the Relationship Between Nonpurge Binge Eating Severity and Weight inWomen Using the Set Point Theoryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTimmerman, Gayleen_US
dc.author.detailsGayle Timmerman, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: gtimmerman@mail.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166011-
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this presentation is to examine the relationship between nonpurge binge eating severity and weight in women using the set point theory as the conceptual framework. Selected findings from a research study with a voluntary sample of nonpurge binge eating women from varying age groups will be used to provide a better understanding of how the set point theory can be used to explain the relationship of nonpurge binge eating and weight. Nonpurge binge eating is the uncontrolled eating of a large amount of food in a specific period of time without compensatory purging behaviors characteristic of bulimia nervosa. Although binge eating is a prevalent problem in the obese population (20-50%), the relationship between binge eating and degree of obesity has not been adequately explored. According to the set point theory of energy regulation, weight is regulated within the parameters of a specific level or set point. Stability is maintained by balancing energy intake with energy expenditure. However, the increased metabolic rate associated with increased energy intake appears to be temporary. Past research findings indicate that the set point can become elevated with prolonged overfeeding of high fat diets. Obesity is thought to represent the regulation of weight at an elevated set point. Based on the set point theory, a model for binge-induced obesity was hypothesized for this study: 1) when binge episodes become a frequent, regular pattern, the body's set point would become elevated; and 2) a long history of binge eating would contribute to degree of obesity by progressively elevating the set point. In this study, binge eating severity was measured by adding the calorie intake during each binge episode (> 1,000 kcal/episode) as recorded in food diaries over 28 days. Degree of obesity was measured by percent of body fat and body mass index (BMI). Binge eating severity had a low, but significant association with BMI and was not significantly related to percent of body fat. The low correlations failed to support the proposed model for binge-induced obesity. The large fluctuations in binge eating patterns may explain the low correlations between binge eating severity and degree of obesity. The variability in binge frequency and amount consumed during binges over time contradicts the assumption that binge episodes become frequent and regular enough to elevate the set point. Thus, the binge-induced model for obesity may only hold true for the subset of binge eaters with a progressive increase in binge eating severity over time. Another possible explanation may be that amount of fat consumed during binges, rather than the amount of calories, has a stronger relationship to degree of obesity.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:23Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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