2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166013
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intensive Care Outcomes in an Elderly Population
Author(s):
Prevost, Suzanne S.
Author Details:
Suzanne Prevost, PhD, NHC Chair of Nursing Excellence, Middle Tennessee State University, School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: sprevost@mtsu.edu
Abstract:
As the incentives of managed care force us to scrutinize expensive interventions, we must continually evaluate the outcomes of critical care for high risk populations. The elderly are one high risk group that is being seen with increasing frequency in intensive care units. Critical care nurses often ponder questions related to the appropriateness and potential futility of intensive care for the elderly. Research questions posed in this study were: 1) What are the demographic characteristics of elderly patients admitted to an intensive care unit? 2) What are the outcomes for the elderly after discharge from intensive care? and 3) Are there relationships between demographic characteristics and outcomes, in a critically ill elderly population? Methods: In this descriptive, correlational study, we followed 120 patients over age 70 who were cared for in an intensive care unit for greater than 36 hours. The setting was a 16 bed mixed medical-surgical unit in a community hospital. Findings: The mean age was 77.7 years, mean ICU length of stay - 7.6 days, mean hospital length of stay - 17.8 days, and mean charges $47,331. 47.5% of subjects were discharged to their homes, 16.7% to other hospitals or rehabilitation facilities, 10% to nursing homes, and 25% expired prior to hospital discharge. Mortality was higher in men (30.6%), than women (23.2%), and higher in widowed/single (32.8%) than married (14.6%) subjects. Spearman correlations revealed relationships between age and discharge status (p<.0001) and ICU length of stay and discharge status (p<.0001). The relationship between age and charges was not significant. Implications: Although the mortality rate and charges were high, overall discharge outcomes were positive, consistent with previous studies which have denounced the use of age as a criterion for ICU bed allocation. Recommendations for future research include expansion of the study to more than one institution and a broader ethnic representation; and investigation of the influence of marital status on mortality in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntensive Care Outcomes in an Elderly Populationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPrevost, Suzanne S.en_US
dc.author.detailsSuzanne Prevost, PhD, NHC Chair of Nursing Excellence, Middle Tennessee State University, School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA, email: sprevost@mtsu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166013en
dc.description.abstractAs the incentives of managed care force us to scrutinize expensive interventions, we must continually evaluate the outcomes of critical care for high risk populations. The elderly are one high risk group that is being seen with increasing frequency in intensive care units. Critical care nurses often ponder questions related to the appropriateness and potential futility of intensive care for the elderly. Research questions posed in this study were: 1) What are the demographic characteristics of elderly patients admitted to an intensive care unit? 2) What are the outcomes for the elderly after discharge from intensive care? and 3) Are there relationships between demographic characteristics and outcomes, in a critically ill elderly population? Methods: In this descriptive, correlational study, we followed 120 patients over age 70 who were cared for in an intensive care unit for greater than 36 hours. The setting was a 16 bed mixed medical-surgical unit in a community hospital. Findings: The mean age was 77.7 years, mean ICU length of stay - 7.6 days, mean hospital length of stay - 17.8 days, and mean charges $47,331. 47.5% of subjects were discharged to their homes, 16.7% to other hospitals or rehabilitation facilities, 10% to nursing homes, and 25% expired prior to hospital discharge. Mortality was higher in men (30.6%), than women (23.2%), and higher in widowed/single (32.8%) than married (14.6%) subjects. Spearman correlations revealed relationships between age and discharge status (p<.0001) and ICU length of stay and discharge status (p<.0001). The relationship between age and charges was not significant. Implications: Although the mortality rate and charges were high, overall discharge outcomes were positive, consistent with previous studies which have denounced the use of age as a criterion for ICU bed allocation. Recommendations for future research include expansion of the study to more than one institution and a broader ethnic representation; and investigation of the influence of marital status on mortality in this population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:25Zen
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:25Zen
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en
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