2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166016
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What is the Child's Role?
Author(s):
Horner, Sharon
Author Details:
Sharon Horner, PhD, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA, email:s.horner@mail.utexas.edu
Abstract:
"Who are You?" said the Caterpillar. Alice replied, rather shyly, "I - I hardly know, sir, just at present - at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then." Lewis Carroll, 1865/1989. A survey of nursing literature reveals that much of the research on families addresses parental concerns. There are fewer studies that address the child's perspective with the child as the informant. The question addressed in this presentation is: Given the range of developmental capabilities, at what point is the child considered a valid data source in the research design? The answer, in part, depends on the research question. After identifying a research question, one must then decide who or what is the best data source for answering the question. Because children are situated within families, the growing body of literature on family research provides a framework for exploring the central question of data source. In many studies of children, the data source is an adult -- either a teacher, a parent, an observer, or other person with some connection to the child. Traditionally family researchers have relied on a single informant for information about family phenomena, including child health and illness processes. This trend may stem, in part, from positivistic assumptions about the need for objectivity to render the research product validity. Based on this assumption, the child is not considered an "accurate" source of data, because of lack of insight or perspective for interpreting experiences. While children may prove to be "weak" sources for historical facts, they are rich sources of interpretive insights into thier lived experiences. As nursing science techniques have "matured," this positivisitic assumption is challenged, and the child is being included as a valid data source in studies which strive to uncover the total picture of the child's health and illness experiences. Strengths and weaknesses of research designs using children and/or adults as data sources in studies of children's health and illness experiences will be discussed. Mechanisms for enhancing data validity will be discussed with examples from current research presented.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat is the Child's Role?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHorner, Sharonen_US
dc.author.detailsSharon Horner, PhD, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA, email:s.horner@mail.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166016-
dc.description.abstract"Who are You?" said the Caterpillar. Alice replied, rather shyly, "I - I hardly know, sir, just at present - at least I know who I was when I got up this morning, but I think I must have been changed several times since then." Lewis Carroll, 1865/1989. A survey of nursing literature reveals that much of the research on families addresses parental concerns. There are fewer studies that address the child's perspective with the child as the informant. The question addressed in this presentation is: Given the range of developmental capabilities, at what point is the child considered a valid data source in the research design? The answer, in part, depends on the research question. After identifying a research question, one must then decide who or what is the best data source for answering the question. Because children are situated within families, the growing body of literature on family research provides a framework for exploring the central question of data source. In many studies of children, the data source is an adult -- either a teacher, a parent, an observer, or other person with some connection to the child. Traditionally family researchers have relied on a single informant for information about family phenomena, including child health and illness processes. This trend may stem, in part, from positivistic assumptions about the need for objectivity to render the research product validity. Based on this assumption, the child is not considered an "accurate" source of data, because of lack of insight or perspective for interpreting experiences. While children may prove to be "weak" sources for historical facts, they are rich sources of interpretive insights into thier lived experiences. As nursing science techniques have "matured," this positivisitic assumption is challenged, and the child is being included as a valid data source in studies which strive to uncover the total picture of the child's health and illness experiences. Strengths and weaknesses of research designs using children and/or adults as data sources in studies of children's health and illness experiences will be discussed. Mechanisms for enhancing data validity will be discussed with examples from current research presented.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:29Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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