2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166018
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Methodology and children: Overcoming barriers
Author(s):
Percy, Melanie
Author Details:
Melanie Percy, PhD, University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: mpercy@mail.utexas.edu
Abstract:
Traditionally, children have been studied from an adult perspective. A review of current literature demonstrated the prevalence of parental reporting in research designs focusing on children. Not surprisingly infants, and young children are most frequently studied by observation or parental report. As children become verbal they are more likely to be directly involved in the study as a data source. Visual analog scales, paper and pencil tests, observation and interviews are common techniques for verbal children. Biological parameters are generally gathered through non-invasive means. Any research design involving children as the data source must be tailored to the child's developmental level. Fine and gross motor co-ordination, activity level, expressive and receptive language ability, attention span, and reading level are areas of concern when planning research with children. Whether using a quantitative or qualitative method developmental issues remain paramount in design development. Structuring the research to include a variety of different activitieis helps to prevent boredom and maintains the child's interest in the research process. Children are frequently intimidated by adult authority figures and may be inhibited by one-to-one contact with an adult researcher. A group of peers can provide feelings of safety and security for the child who is uncomfortable with adults. Group data gathering techniques facilitate communication between the child and researcher. The researcher must also be aware of the child's physical needs. Conducting the interview in a comfortable room, accepting the child's need to move about, or providing snacks are necessary adaptations to the research process. Developmental considerations critical to research design will be discussed. Specific examples and techniques appropriate to each age group will be delineated. Experience using children's photography, video tapings, and drawings in qualitative research projects will be presented.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMethodology and children: Overcoming barriersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPercy, Melanieen_US
dc.author.detailsMelanie Percy, PhD, University of Texas at Austin, School of Nursing, Austin, Texas, USA, email: mpercy@mail.utexas.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166018-
dc.description.abstractTraditionally, children have been studied from an adult perspective. A review of current literature demonstrated the prevalence of parental reporting in research designs focusing on children. Not surprisingly infants, and young children are most frequently studied by observation or parental report. As children become verbal they are more likely to be directly involved in the study as a data source. Visual analog scales, paper and pencil tests, observation and interviews are common techniques for verbal children. Biological parameters are generally gathered through non-invasive means. Any research design involving children as the data source must be tailored to the child's developmental level. Fine and gross motor co-ordination, activity level, expressive and receptive language ability, attention span, and reading level are areas of concern when planning research with children. Whether using a quantitative or qualitative method developmental issues remain paramount in design development. Structuring the research to include a variety of different activitieis helps to prevent boredom and maintains the child's interest in the research process. Children are frequently intimidated by adult authority figures and may be inhibited by one-to-one contact with an adult researcher. A group of peers can provide feelings of safety and security for the child who is uncomfortable with adults. Group data gathering techniques facilitate communication between the child and researcher. The researcher must also be aware of the child's physical needs. Conducting the interview in a comfortable room, accepting the child's need to move about, or providing snacks are necessary adaptations to the research process. Developmental considerations critical to research design will be discussed. Specific examples and techniques appropriate to each age group will be delineated. Experience using children's photography, video tapings, and drawings in qualitative research projects will be presented.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:31Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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