Effects of Communication Skills Training on Psychosocial Adjustment Among CouplesLiving with Spinal Cord Injury

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/166021
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of Communication Skills Training on Psychosocial Adjustment Among CouplesLiving with Spinal Cord Injury
Author(s):
Captain, Constance
Author Details:
Constance Captain, PhD, Associate Chief Nursing Research, South Texas Veterans Healthcare System, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: constance.captain@med.va.gov
Abstract:
Purpose. In this outcome study of programs designed for couples living with spinal cord injury (SCI), a communication skills training program was compared with an experiential learning program to determine changes in couples' interactions and psychosocial adjustment on standardized measurement instruments before and after program participation. Background. The communication project was predicated on the assumption that if a couple could learn to communicate more effectively, they may be better able to manage the adjustments that arise with SCI. The need for a program of this type derives from several sources: (1) adapting to SCI reaches far beyond adjusting to the physical alterations of injury; (2) recent research findings identify marital stability and a positive family environment as critical factors in successful rehabilitation outcomes; (3) a communication skills approach offers a promising framework as indicated in studies with "normal" couples; and (4) limited formal resources necessitate the development of intervention programs that optimize existing supports, such as the marital relationship. Subjects. Seventeen couples with a SCI member were randomly assigned to one of the two four-week communication programs. The overall attendance rate was 93%. Characteristics of the couples were as follows: (1) 88% were married (for two couples the partner was a caregiver), (2) 82.4% of persons with SCI were male, (3) average length of marriage was 19.5 years (SD=18.85), (4) average age of the SCI person was 52 years (SD=15.2), range 19-73 years), and (5) 58.8% of persons with SCI were paraplegic. Findings. Statistical analyses using repeated measures ANOVAs indicated significant improvements in communication behaviors among couples in the skills-training program. No group differences were found on self-report measures of psychosocial adjustment factors. Secondary analysis of SCI persons and partners indicated significant improvement in psychosocial adjustment for partners, regardless of program assignment. Couples' scores on a coping inventory compared favorably with norms established with couples without physical disability. The scores on the psychosocial adjustment measure indicated poorer adjustment than that noted in populations with breast cancer and heart transplant surgery. Implications. These data indicate the benefits of communication skills programs designed for SCI persons and their partners in improving relationship skills and assisting couples to adapt to the demands of SCI. Couples work in groups promotes networking among couples and is cost effective.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
Feb 29 - Mar 2, 1996
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of Communication Skills Training on Psychosocial Adjustment Among CouplesLiving with Spinal Cord Injuryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCaptain, Constanceen_US
dc.author.detailsConstance Captain, PhD, Associate Chief Nursing Research, South Texas Veterans Healthcare System, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: constance.captain@med.va.goven_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/166021-
dc.description.abstractPurpose. In this outcome study of programs designed for couples living with spinal cord injury (SCI), a communication skills training program was compared with an experiential learning program to determine changes in couples' interactions and psychosocial adjustment on standardized measurement instruments before and after program participation. Background. The communication project was predicated on the assumption that if a couple could learn to communicate more effectively, they may be better able to manage the adjustments that arise with SCI. The need for a program of this type derives from several sources: (1) adapting to SCI reaches far beyond adjusting to the physical alterations of injury; (2) recent research findings identify marital stability and a positive family environment as critical factors in successful rehabilitation outcomes; (3) a communication skills approach offers a promising framework as indicated in studies with "normal" couples; and (4) limited formal resources necessitate the development of intervention programs that optimize existing supports, such as the marital relationship. Subjects. Seventeen couples with a SCI member were randomly assigned to one of the two four-week communication programs. The overall attendance rate was 93%. Characteristics of the couples were as follows: (1) 88% were married (for two couples the partner was a caregiver), (2) 82.4% of persons with SCI were male, (3) average length of marriage was 19.5 years (SD=18.85), (4) average age of the SCI person was 52 years (SD=15.2), range 19-73 years), and (5) 58.8% of persons with SCI were paraplegic. Findings. Statistical analyses using repeated measures ANOVAs indicated significant improvements in communication behaviors among couples in the skills-training program. No group differences were found on self-report measures of psychosocial adjustment factors. Secondary analysis of SCI persons and partners indicated significant improvement in psychosocial adjustment for partners, regardless of program assignment. Couples' scores on a coping inventory compared favorably with norms established with couples without physical disability. The scores on the psychosocial adjustment measure indicated poorer adjustment than that noted in populations with breast cancer and heart transplant surgery. Implications. These data indicate the benefits of communication skills programs designed for SCI persons and their partners in improving relationship skills and assisting couples to adapt to the demands of SCI. Couples work in groups promotes networking among couples and is cost effective.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:38:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:38:35Z-
dc.conference.dateFeb 29 - Mar 2, 1996en_US
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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